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TribesNext.com Forums => Support => Topic started by: Blakhart on May 28, 2011, 11:40:47 AM



Title: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on May 28, 2011, 11:40:47 AM
Greetings T2 players!
It is I, your Tribes Rabbi here with some gems of the settings kind to increase fps or image quality. Or both. Ahem. As with most everything fps is a balance of tradeoffs. Nice image quality vs pure frames per second. If all you want is fps, head straight to the color depth control of your vid card and set it to 16bit and read no further. If you want to see how good t2 (and most any other game) can look  with little fps impact, read on.

To begin with, let us discuss overall video card settings as found in any vid card driver control panel. There are two main controls that we are interested in right now. One of the settings is called Anistropic filtering, the other is the setting for Antialiasing. Aniso sharpens images, especially those in the distance, while anti does the opposite, it smudges images a bit to get rid of the jaggies. jaggies are the jagged lines that come from aliasing of pixels. We need them both for best image quality, but they do cost some fps.

See examples of aniso and anti here:
http://www.extremetech.com/article2/0,2845,2136956,00.asp

Now the vid cards of today, and some slightly older ones, can handle the max anisotropic filtering with very little if any performance impact. In this case often 16x anisoropic filtering is available and will make the game, most any game not just t2, look great while not affecting fps much.

 The real fps killer is antialiasing, more specifically the grievous memory reads and writes and the gpu calcs done on pixels when anti is cranked way up. Any more than 2x antialiasing will drop fps a good deal, and by good deal I mean by a noticeable amount. With the resolutions most lcds run at, and we should all be running at the native resolution of our lcds, high resolution does a lot towards getting rid of jaggies, but hi res is also an fps killer by itself as the vid card must draw x number of pixels by x number of pixels and then perform aniso and anti on them. This means all we need is to run 2x antialiasing to clean up the most horrid of the jaggies as a high res (greater than 1024x768 for example) naturally eliminates jaggies.

Keep in mind that one must force these options in a profile or other method in the driver control panel.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on May 28, 2011, 12:00:44 PM
So now that we have some basic vid card settings under our belts, we can talk about card specifics. By that I mean ati and nvidia. One setting that is kinda common to both ati and nvid is the threaded optimisation control. I have found that on some drivers and some cards you can enable this for t2 and play is fine, other cards and drivers it makes t2 stutter. You will have to test it on your system, if it is available.

Ati cards, when playing t2, should have temporal and/or adaptive antialiasing and Catalyst A.I. disabled for t2. These seem to cause trouble in t2 when enabled. Your mileage may vary but I have had a more stable t2 game without these options enabled. I suggest simply running 2x anti and 16x aniso for ati cards, but you may be able to enable the threaded optimisation.

As to nvid cards, I run 2x anti and 16x aniso and set the Antialiasing-Transparency control to supersampling, wich should be much nicer than when set to Multisampling. Also, I have noticed lag when multisampling was enabled rather than supersampling, wich is very odd since Supersampling is much more gpu and mem intensive than Multisampling. What these settings control is how textures look that have transparent parts, such as leaves on trees and grasses and so on. From what I gather the "alpha test" the game performs to see what is transparent and what is not for textures that are partially transparent is laggy when set to multisample rather than the higher quality supersampling, so in this case it's a win, but not a Charlie Sheen win.

SLI
If you have an sli system, meaning two or more vid cards installed (and I am talking nvid here as I have no experience with ati cards running crossfire), you can play t2 with sli enabled. You must enable sli in your control panel, and then go down and set the sli mode, either split frame rendering or alternating frame rendering. Split frame seems to offer more instant response to input from ouse and kb than alternate frame, and that is odd since split frame causes a lot more communication between the vid cards, meaning more latency is added, than if run in alternating frame mode. Pick one mode and see how it plays for you.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on May 28, 2011, 12:13:23 PM
In-Game settings
Disable vertex lighting; this is a ue maker. Set pretty much everything full right. The reason why full right is good is cuz it causes the game to force all textures into memory rather than nickle and diming these textures on call, wich causes video card memory traffic that is best avoided as that is also called lag. Set to 32bit color. Disable Interior Textured Fog, this may be an eater of fps with no real benefit. Disable the precipitaion if you find it annoying, and yes it does add to the cost in fps. Set the decals (bullet holes, footprints, etc) to your liking. Enable the texture compression setting and set to fastest - if you notice people walking through you or you walking through people, disable texture compression. Also, the terrain texture cache size line in clientprefs.cs may be set to 4096 rather than the 240 or so that it normaly is.

Some settings to try in clientprefs.cs:
(back up your original cs first)
$pref::OpenGL::maxHardwareLights = "8";
$pref::sceneLighting::cacheLighting = 4;
$pref::sceneLighting::cacheSize = 98304;
$pref::sceneLighting::purgeMethod = "lastModified";
$pref::sceneLighting::terrainGenerateLevel = 4;


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on May 29, 2011, 06:32:24 AM
Nvidia goodness:
http://nvidia.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/nvidia.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=2624

"Question
  In the launch drivers for GeForce GTX 400 series GPUs, there was a bug in the Transparency Antialiasing implementation that enabled full-screen supersampling. Is there any way to still get full-screen supersampling in Release 256?
 
  Answer
  Yes. Release 256 drivers do fix the implementation of Transparency Antialiasing (TRAA) and now offer up to 25% performance improvements with TRAA enabled. However, since some of our gaming really enthusiasts liked the full-screen supersampling, we have created a tool for users that allows them to enable 2x, 4x, and 8x full-screen supersampling. "

If you have an nvid card that is an 8800 or newer core, you can use this tool from nvid that will enable full screen SSAA (Super Sample Anti Aliasing) in all games. This makes t2 look better than I have ever seen it. With 2x antialiasing and 16x anisotropic filtering enabled in the driver control panel, just fire up the SSAA tool and set it to 2x SSAA and enjoy. You must also have an nvid driver that is of the 25xxx series or newer. Keep in mind that this full screen SSAA placeas a relatively huge load on your vid card, but if your card has the power to pull it off with playable fps you will be rewarded with outstanding image quality. It really makes t2 look good. Sorry ati cards, this is nvid only. But you had nice image quality all the time so don't feel bad!


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Heat Killer on May 31, 2011, 05:07:07 PM
*slow clap*
Nicely done.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on June 03, 2011, 06:51:08 AM
Here are some helps for the old time ati cards, the 95/96/97/9800 series.

First off, use a driver that was written when the card was still new - and this advice also applies to just about any vid card. This means mostly the cat 5.11 or thereabouts. This driver will work fine in t2, and has an option to enable threaded optimisation, and should play t2 without stuttering. If the cat 5.11 series doesn't work for your os, not much I can do for you. As to the later ati cards, use a new(er) driver, they should play fine if you follow the above hints on ati cards.





Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: pbjonathan on June 04, 2011, 06:32:22 PM
thanks for the info I have a newer nvidia card and some of these settings helped a lot


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on June 06, 2011, 06:05:35 AM
Glad someone finds this info helpfull.

Also, here's a tip from Capt. Kinzi:
Code:
SetPerfCounterEnable(0);
Capt. Kinzi: cook some derms for me!

Copy the above code and paste it into a .txt file, save it, and rename it to fix.cs, pop it into the gamedata/base/scripts/autoexec folder. You can name it anything you want to that is not already taken, actually, as long as it ends in .cs. If you had microstutter in game before due to running t2 on a multicore system, this "fix" should eliminate or at least reduce the stuttering. With my system being as highly strung as it is, I find the game is smoother with it set to 1 rather than 0, most will find 0 (zero, not O) works best. In the pc world, 1 means true, on, or enabled, 0 means false, off, or disabled, at least as far as booleans go. Try it both ways and see what this boolean can do for you!


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on June 09, 2011, 04:44:50 AM
For those with older ati cards and having issues seeing the game menues:

Code:
// ----
//
//  270 fps to 13ms refresh
//
// ----

$radeonAAfix::refresh = 13;

// ----

function GuiCanvas::RadeonAAfix( %this )
{
    if( playGui.isAwake() )
        return;
    if( $fps::real > 10 )
        %this.repaint();

    %refresh = mfloor( $radeonAAfix::refresh );
    $radeonAAfix::thread = %this.schedule( %refresh, RadeonAAfix );
}

package RadeonAAfix
{
    function PlayGui::onWake( %this )
    {
        parent::onWake( %this );
        cancel( $radeonAAfix::thread );
    }

    function PlayGui::onSleep( %this )
    {
        parent::onSleep( %this );
        canvas.RadeonAAfix();
    }
};

activatePackage( RadeonAAfix );
canvas.RadeonAAfix();


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on June 15, 2011, 06:09:01 AM
A word on vsynch.

If you are displeased by screen tearing in game, there is a method to reduce that tearing, and also to reduce heat, noise, and power consumption in your game system.

An example of screen tearing:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screen_tearing

What can be done to eliminate screen tearing is to synch each frame rendered of the game with the refresh rate of the monitor as described in the above wiki link.

There actually is a control in t2 to enable this but most operating systems or vid card drivers override this in-game control, so we must use a driver control panel to force vsynch, or even employ a 3rd party app to force vsynch.

Here is an example of a 3rd party refresh rate locker:
http://www.pagehosting.co.uk/rl/

To use it one must rtfm. In short, you set the lock to the same frequency as your monitor's fastest suitable refresh rate. If you have a driver control panel or operating system control that can do this you are better off as it will or should then be automatic in operation rather than having to start the app each time one wished to play. So now we have cleaned up the tearing but we have mucked the performance a bit, haven't we? I mean going from 400fps with tearing to the refresh rate of our monitor (60 to 120Hz in most cases) without tearing, we feel disarmed and helpless against those who are running at a higher fps.

One way to empower ourselves against "high fps barstewards" is to go into the driver control panel and enable triple buffering. Here is why triple buffering is a joy:
http://www.anandtech.com/show/2794

If you enable vsynch, you should enable triple buffering. You will get a much smoother and responsive game and the added buffer will make sure you can drop an old frame that has since passed its accuracy of gamestate for a new one instantly. Well, really your vid card does it for you.


The reduced heat, noise, and power use that I mentioned earlier stems from the locking of the frame rate to vsynch. Your vid card is running nowhere near full throttle, it is loafing along at your refresh rate. This makes the card run much cooler than if it was at 400fps for 20 minutes. Less work in the vid card means less heat, and also less power usage. Your vid card should last much longer. If you have voiltage regulator whine noise in games from your vid card running at wide open throttle, this whine should be reduced or even eliminated if you run vsynch.

Another benefit I find from the combinatiojn of vsynch and triple buffering is the consistency of play. When you are always at (add your refresh rate here) your game is much more predictable than with the fps all over the place as with vsynch disabled.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on June 15, 2011, 06:22:00 AM
For the folks with onboard grafix:
Code:
// #autoload
// #name = FrameSkippa
// #version = 1.0
// #author = {Geez}Bluez
// #warrior =  Bluez
// #email = Bluez@oldfogieshome.com
// #status = Release
// #include = support/team_tracker.cs
// #description = Increases FPS by skipping predetermined frameskip settings.
// #config = FrameSkippa_Config

function FrameSkippa_GUI(%this) {
new ShellFieldCtrl(FrameSkippa_Config) {
profile = "ShellFieldProfile";
horizSizing = "center";
vertSizing = "center";
position = "131 122";
extent = "138 109";
minExtent = "16 18";
visible = "1";
hideCursor = "0";
bypassHideCursor = "0";
helpTag = "0";

new ShellFieldCtrl() {
profile = "ShellFieldProfile";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "5 4";
extent = "128 26";
minExtent = "16 18";
visible = "1";
hideCursor = "0";
bypassHideCursor = "0";
helpTag = "0";
};
new ShellFieldCtrl() {
profile = "ShellFieldProfile";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "4 83";
extent = "128 22";
minExtent = "16 18";
visible = "1";
hideCursor = "0";
bypassHideCursor = "0";
helpTag = "0";
};
new GuiTextCtrl(frameskipvalue) {
profile = "ShellTextCenterProfile";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "1 85";
extent = "134 22";
minExtent = "8 8";
visible = "1";
hideCursor = "0";
bypassHideCursor = "0";
helpTag = "0";
longTextBuffer = "0";
maxLength = "255";
};
new GuiTextCtrl() {
profile = "BrowserH1Profile";
horizSizing = "center";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "7 3";
extent = "124 32";
minExtent = "8 8";
visible = "1";
hideCursor = "0";
bypassHideCursor = "0";
helpTag = "0";
text = "Frame Skippa\'";
longTextBuffer = "0";
maxLength = "255";
};
new ShellBitmapButton() {
profile = "ShellButtonProfile";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "102 50";
extent = "42 38";
minExtent = "32 38";
visible = "1";
hideCursor = "0";
bypassHideCursor = "0";
command = "$pref::FrameSkippa::Value = 5; Frameskippa_set();";
helpTag = "0";
text = "5";
simpleStyle = "0";
};
new ShellBitmapButton() {
profile = "ShellButtonProfile";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "-5 50";
extent = "42 38";
minExtent = "32 38";
visible = "1";
hideCursor = "0";
bypassHideCursor = "0";
command = "$pref::FrameSkippa::Value = 1; Frameskippa_set();";
helpTag = "0";
text = "1";
simpleStyle = "0";
};
new ShellBitmapButton() {
profile = "ShellButtonProfile";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "22 50";
extent = "42 38";
minExtent = "32 38";
visible = "1";
hideCursor = "0";
bypassHideCursor = "0";
command = "$pref::FrameSkippa::Value = 2; Frameskippa_set();";
helpTag = "0";
text = "2";
simpleStyle = "0";
};
new ShellBitmapButton() {
profile = "ShellButtonProfile";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "48 50";
extent = "42 38";
minExtent = "32 38";
visible = "1";
hideCursor = "0";
bypassHideCursor = "0";
command = "$pref::FrameSkippa::Value = 3; Frameskippa_set();";
helpTag = "0";
text = "3";
simpleStyle = "0";
};
new ShellBitmapButton() {
profile = "ShellButtonProfile";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "75 50";
extent = "42 38";
minExtent = "32 38";
visible = "1";
hideCursor = "0";
bypassHideCursor = "0";
command = "$pref::FrameSkippa::Value = 4; Frameskippa_set();";
helpTag = "0";
text = "4";
simpleStyle = "0";
};
new ShellBitmapButton() {
profile = "ShellButtonProfile";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "-5 24";
extent = "147 38";
minExtent = "32 38";
visible = "1";
hideCursor = "0";
bypassHideCursor = "0";
command = "$pref::FrameSkippa::Value = 0; Frameskippa_set();";
helpTag = "0";
text = "Disable/Default 0";
simpleStyle = "0";
};
};
             if($pref::FrameSkippa::Value $= "")
                $pref::FrameSkippa::Value = 0;
                else
                Frameskippa_set();
}
 
package FrameSkippa {
function Frameskippa_set(%this) {
         $frameskip = $pref::FrameSkippa::Value;
         frameskipvalue.setValue("CURRENT SETTING:" SPC ($pref::FrameSkippa::Value)); }
};
activatePackage(FrameSkippa);
callback.add(TeamUpdated, Frameskippa_set);
FrameSkippa_GUI();

What the above code does is "Increases FPS by skipping predetermined frameskip settings".

Like most scripts, this script is support.vl2 aware, so you should have support.vl2 if you do not already. After placing the script (first copy/save as fs.cs or some other desired name) into your autoexec folder you then fire up the game and get to the script option and set it to 2 for some tesing. Play a bit and see if you like it. It is pretty much a full time interpolate script in effect. I find that a setting of 3 is way too much, 2 is just fine and gives a decent apparent boost, and 1 does little to nothing. If you run into ues with this script, and I have, either change settings or disable/delete it and go on your merry way.

This script will show higher fps than refresh rate if you use vsynch and this script. This is normal and vsynch is still working.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on June 30, 2011, 05:22:32 AM
Texture Filtering

Texture filtering is a control found in most vid card driver control panels. This control is basically a cheat control. Cheat in the sense that this control modifies how accurately the vid card renders a scene, either as the scene is presented and according to all setrtings such as aniso or antialias filtration, or if the vid card can skip some filtering routines for the sake of speed or less memory taken.

The settings typically range from High Performance to High Quality, with High Quality pretty much making the vid card respond to every game frame being drawn precisely as the game calls it to be, whereas High Performance allows the vid card to skip a alot of detail that would make the game look better but cost a bit in fps. All you have to remember is High Performance means fast and ugly, High Quality means slower but prettier.  Usually much prettier.

When one installs a vid card driver the driver usualy sets everything to a default of Quality  texture filtering, and while this is not the worst, it is not the best. This filtering level helps vid card makers get higher scores in benchmarks but it costs in image quality in games. And we all know that T2, while looking great in 2001, is quite ugly compared to most pc games of today. This means we should give T2 all the help it can get.

Here's a writeup on the issue with examples:
http://www.firingsquad.com/hardware/ati_nvidia_image_quality_showdown_august06/

Now, if you never noticed the effect of texture shimmer bef\ore, I am sorry to have made you aware, same goes for the need for anisotropic filtering and antialiasing as described above. But shimmer I find to be distracting as it actually moves as you do so it catches the eye. The way to best reduce texture shimmer is to run the control at High Quality to reduce texture shimmering to a minimum. There will still be some shimmer in odd places at High Quality, but much reduced over settings such as High Performance. Try the various texture filter settings to see what is given up for fps performance.



Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on July 04, 2011, 01:14:53 PM
This script keeps tabs on your ping and fps map by map and creates a hard copy. It logs in the log folder of your t2 install, view it to see your stats as far as system performance goes. As always, copy/save as serverstuff.cs, paste into the autoexec folder of your scripts folder. Works automatically.

Code:
// #autoload
// #name = ServerStuff
// #version = 0.1
// #author = ilys
// #category = ilys' Scripts
// #include = support/callback.cs
// #include = support/mission_callbacks.cs
// #include = support/file_tools.cs

$ServerStuff::ShowHud = 0;
$ServerStuff::PingNum = 0;
$ServerStuff::CurrentPing = 0;
$ServerStuff::TotalPing = 0;
$ServerStuff::MaxPing = 0;
$ServerStuff::MinPing = 0;
$ServerStuff::AvPing = 0;
$ServerStuff::PLNum = 0;
$ServerStuff::CurrentPL = 0;
$ServerStuff::TotalPL = 0;
$ServerStuff::MaxPL = 0;
$ServerStuff::MinPL = 0;
$ServerStuff::AvPL = 0;
$ServerStuff::FPSNum = 0;
$ServerStuff::CurrentFPS = 0;
$ServerStuff::TotalFPS = 0;
$ServerStuff::MaxFPS = 0;
$ServerStuff::MinFPS = 0;
$ServerStuff::AvFPS = 0;
$ServerStuff::ServerTimeSec = "0"@0;
$ServerStuff::ServerTimeMin = "0"@0;
$ServerStuff::ServerTimeHour = "0"@0;
$ServerStuff::MapTimeSec = "0"@0;
$ServerStuff::MapTimeMin = "0"@0;
$ServerStuff::MapTimeHour = "0"@0;

package ServerStuff {
function PlayGui::onWake(%this)
{
Callback.add(onMatchStart, "ServerStuffReset");
Callback.add(onGameOver, "ServerStuffExportLog");
Callback.add(onUserClientDrop, "ServerStuffExportServerLog");
parent::onWake(%this);
if(!isObject(PlayGui)) return;
if(isObject(ServerStuffHud)) return;
new GuiControlProfile ("SSHudLabel")
{
fontType = "Univers Condensed";
fontSize = 16;
fontColor = "255 255 255";
justify = "center";
};
new GuiControlProfile ("SSHudText")
{
fontType = "Univers Condensed";
fontSize = 16;
fontColor = "0 255 0";
justify = "center";
};
new ShellFieldCtrl(ServerStuffHud)
{
profile = "GuiChatBackProfile";
horizSizing = "left";
vertSizing = "bottom";
extent = "300 185";
visible = "0";
new GuiTextCtrl()
{
profile = "SSHudLabel";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "0 0";
extent = "100 16 ";
visible = "1";
text = "Server Name:";
};
new GuiMLTextCtrl(SSServerName)
{
profile = "SSHudText";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "100 0";
extent = "200 16 ";
visible = "1";
};
new GuiTextCtrl()
{
profile = "SSHudLabel";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "0 20";
extent = "100 16 ";
visible = "1";
text = "Server IP:";
};
new GuiMLTextCtrl(SSServerIP)
{
profile = "SSHudText";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "100 20";
extent = "200 16 ";
visible = "1";
};
new GuiTextCtrl()
{
profile = "SSHudLabel";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "0 40";
extent = "100 16 ";
visible = "1";
text = "Server Map Name:";
};
new GuiMLTextCtrl(SSServerMapName)
{
profile = "SSHudText";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "100 40";
extent = "200 16 ";
visible = "1";
};
new GuiTextCtrl()
{
profile = "SSHudLabel";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "0 60";
extent = "100 16 ";
visible = "1";
text = "Server Map Type:";
};
new GuiMLTextCtrl(SSServerMapType)
{
profile = "SSHudText";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "100 60";
extent = "200 16 ";
visible = "1";
};
new GuiTextCtrl()
{
profile = "SSHudLabel";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "0 80";
extent = "100 16 ";
visible = "1";
text = "Current Ping:";
};
new GuiMLTextCtrl(SSCurPing)
{
profile = "SSHudText";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "100 80";
extent = "200 16 ";
visible = "1";
};
new GuiTextCtrl()
{
profile = "SSHudLabel";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "150 80";
extent = "100 16 ";
visible = "1";
text = "Average Ping:";
};
new GuiMLTextCtrl(SSAvPing)
{
profile = "SSHudText";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "250 80";
extent = "200 16 ";
visible = "1";
};
new GuiTextCtrl()
{
profile = "SSHudLabel";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "0 100";
extent = "100 16 ";
visible = "1";
text = "Lowest Ping:";
};
new GuiMLTextCtrl(SSMinPing)
{
profile = "SSHudText";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "100 100";
extent = "200 16 ";
visible = "1";
};
new GuiTextCtrl()
{
profile = "SSHudLabel";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "150 100";
extent = "100 16 ";
visible = "1";
text = "Highest Ping:";
};
new GuiMLTextCtrl(SSMaxPing)
{
profile = "SSHudText";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "250 100";
extent = "200 16 ";
visible = "1";
};
new GuiTextCtrl()
{
profile = "SSHudLabel";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "0 120";
extent = "100 16 ";
visible = "1";
text = "Current FPS:";
};
new GuiMLTextCtrl(SSCurFPS)
{
profile = "SSHudText";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "100 120";
extent = "200 16 ";
visible = "1";
};
new GuiTextCtrl()
{
profile = "SSHudLabel";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "150 120";
extent = "100 16 ";
visible = "1";
text = "Average FPS:";
};
new GuiMLTextCtrl(SSAvFPS)
{
profile = "SSHudText";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "250 120";
extent = "250 16 ";
visible = "1";
};
new GuiTextCtrl()
{
profile = "SSHudLabel";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "0 140";
extent = "100 16 ";
visible = "1";
text = "Lowest FPS:";
};
new GuiMLTextCtrl(SSMinFPS)
{
profile = "SSHudText";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "100 140";
extent = "200 16 ";
visible = "1";
};
new GuiTextCtrl()
{
profile = "SSHudLabel";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "150 140";
extent = "100 16 ";
visible = "1";
text = "Highest FPS:";
};
new GuiMLTextCtrl(SSMaxFPS)
{
profile = "SSHudText";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "250 140";
extent = "200 16 ";
visible = "1";
};
new GuiTextCtrl()
{
profile = "SSHudLabel";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "0 160";
extent = "100 16 ";
visible = "1";
text = "Total Time:";
};
new GuiMLTextCtrl(SSServerTime)
{
profile = "SSHudText";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "100 160";
extent = "200 16 ";
visible = "1";
};
new GuiTextCtrl()
{
profile = "SSHudLabel";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "150 160";
extent = "100 16 ";
visible = "1";
text = "Map Time:";
};
new GuiMLTextCtrl(SSMapTime)
{
profile = "SSHudText";
horizSizing = "right";
vertSizing = "bottom";
position = "250 160";
extent = "200 16 ";
visible = "1";
};
};
playGui.add(ServerStuffHud);
if(isObject(HM) && isObject(HudMover)) hudmover::addhud(ServerStuffHud,"ServerStuff");
ServerStuffUpdateHud();
ServerStuffUpdatePL();
ServerStuffUpdateTime();
ServerStuffUpdatePing();
ServerStuffUpdateFPS();
}

function OptionsDlg::onWake( %this )
{
if($ServerStuff::Binds != 1)
{
$RemapName[$RemapCount]="Toggle SSHud";
$RemapCmd[$RemapCount]="ServerStuffToggleHud";
$RemapCount++;
$ServerStuff::Binds = 1;
}
GlobalActionMap.copyBind(moveMap, ServerStuffToggleHud);
parent::onWake( %this );
}

function handleClientJoin(%msgType, %msgString, %clientName, %clientId, %targetId, %isAI, %isAdmin, %isSuperAdmin, %isSmurf, %guid)
{
parent::handleClientJoin(%msgType, %msgString, %clientName, %clientId, %targetId, %isAI, %isAdmin, %isSuperAdmin, %isSmurf, %guid);
if(StrStr(%msgString, "Welcome to Tribes") != -1) $ClientRep = $PlayerList[%clientID];
}

function ServerStuffToggleHud( %val )
{
if (%val)
{
$ServerStuff::ShowHud = !$ServerStuff::ShowHud;
ServerStuffHud.setVisible($ServerStuff::ShowHud);
if ($ServerStuff::ShowHud) ServerStuffUpdateHud();
}
}

function ServerStuffUpdateHud()
{
$SSServerName = MissionCallback.getServerName();
SSServerName.setValue($SSServerName);
$SSServerIP = MissionCallback.getServerAddress();
SSServerIP.setValue($SSServerIP);
$SSServerMapName = MissionCallback.getMissionName();
SSServerMapName.setValue($SSServerMapName);
$SSServerMod = MissionCallback.getServerMod();
$SSServerMapType = MissionCallback.getMissionType();
SSServerMapType.setValue($SSServerMod @ " - " @ $SSServerMapType);
}

function ServerStuffUpdatePing()
{
$ServerStuff::PingNum++;
$ServerStuff::TotalPing = $ServerStuff::TotalPing+$ServerStuff::CurrentPing;
$ServerStuff::AvPing = mFloor($ServerStuff::TotalPing / $ServerStuff::PingNum);
if($ServerStuff::CurrentPing > $ServerStuff::MaxPing || $ServerStuff::MaxPing == 0)
$ServerStuff::MaxPing = $ServerStuff::CurrentPing;
if($ServerStuff::CurrentPing < $ServerStuff::MinPing || $ServerStuff::MinPing == 0)
$ServerStuff::MinPing = $ServerStuff::CurrentPing;
SSCurPing.setValue($ServerStuff::CurrentPing@" / "@$ServerStuff::CurrentPL@"%");
SSAvPing.setValue($ServerStuff::AvPing@" / "@$ServerStuff::AvPL@"%");
SSMinPing.setValue($ServerStuff::MinPing@" / "@$ServerStuff::MinPL@"%");
SSMaxPing.setValue($ServerStuff::MaxPing@" / "@$ServerStuff::MaxPL@"%");
if ($ServerStuffPingSchedule != 0) cancel($ServerStuffPingSchedule);
$ServerStuffPingSchedule = schedule(2500, 0, ServerStuffUpdatePing);
}

function ServerStuffUpdatePL()
{
commandToServer( 'getScores' );
$ServerStuff::PLNum++;
$ServerStuff::CurrentPL = $ClientRep.packetLoss;
$ServerStuff::TotalPL = $ServerStuff::TotalPL+$ServerStuff::CurrentPL;
$ServerStuff::AvPL = mFloor($ServerStuff::TotalPL / $ServerStuff::PLNum);
if($ServerStuff::CurrentPL > $ServerStuff::MaxPL || $ServerStuff::MaxPL == 0)
$ServerStuff::MaxPL = $ServerStuff::CurrentPL;
if($ServerStuff::CurrentPL < $ServerStuff::MinPL || $ServerStuff::MinPL == 0)
$ServerStuff::MinPL = $ServerStuff::CurrentPL;
if ($ServerStuffPLSchedule != 0) cancel($ServerStuffPLSchedule);
$ServerStuffPLSchedule = schedule(5000, 0, ServerStuffUpdatePL);
}

function ServerStuffUpdateFPS()
{
$ServerStuff::FPSNum++;
$ServerStuff::TotalFPS = $ServerStuff::TotalFPS+$ServerStuff::CurrentFPS;
$ServerStuff::AvFPS = mFloor($ServerStuff::TotalFPS / $ServerStuff::FPSNum);
if($ServerStuff::CurrentFPS > $ServerStuff::MaxFPS || $ServerStuff::MaxFPS == 0)
$ServerStuff::MaxFPS = $ServerStuff::CurrentFPS;
if($ServerStuff::CurrentFPS < $ServerStuff::MinFPS || $ServerStuff::MinFPS == 0)
$ServerStuff::MinFPS = $ServerStuff::CurrentFPS;
SSCurFPS.setValue($ServerStuff::CurrentFPS);
SSAvFPS.setValue($ServerStuff::AvFPS);
SSMinFPS.setValue($ServerStuff::MinFPS);
SSMaxFPS.setValue($ServerStuff::MaxFPS);
if ($ServerStuffFPSSchedule != 0) cancel($ServerStuffFPSSchedule);
$ServerStuffFPSSchedule = schedule(2500, 0, ServerStuffUpdateFPS);
}

function ServerStuffUpdateTime()
{
$ServerStuff::ServerTimeSec++;
if(strLen($ServerStuff::ServerTimeSec) == 1) $ServerStuff::ServerTimeSec = "0"@$ServerStuff::ServerTimeSec;
if($ServerStuff::ServerTimeSec == 60)
{
$ServerStuff::ServerTimeSec = "0"@0;
$ServerStuff::ServerTimeMin++;
if(strLen($ServerStuff::ServerTimeMin) == 1) $ServerStuff::ServerTimeMin = "0"@$ServerStuff::ServerTimeMin;
}
if($ServerStuff::ServerTimeMin == 60)
{
$ServerStuff::ServerTimeMin = "0"@0;
$ServerStuff::ServerTimeHour++;
if(strLen($ServerStuff::ServerTimeHour) == 1) $ServerStuff::ServerTimeHour = "0"@$ServerStuff::ServerTimeHour;
}
$ServerStuff::ServerTime = $ServerStuff::ServerTimeHour @ ":" @ $ServerStuff::ServerTimeMin @ ":" @ $ServerStuff::ServerTimeSec;
$ServerStuff::MapTimeSec++;
if(strLen($ServerStuff::MapTimeSec) == 1) $ServerStuff::MapTimeSec = "0"@$ServerStuff::MapTimeSec;
if($ServerStuff::MapTimeSec == 60)
{
$ServerStuff::MapTimeSec = "0"@0;
$ServerStuff::MapTimeMin++;
if(strLen($ServerStuff::MapTimeMin) == 1) $ServerStuff::MapTimeMin = "0"@$ServerStuff::MapTimeMin;
}
if($ServerStuff::MapTimeMin == 60)
{
$ServerStuff::MapTimeMin = "0"@0;
$ServerStuff::MapTimeHour++;
if(strLen($ServerStuff::MapTimeHour) == 1) $ServerStuff::MapTimeHour = "0"@$ServerStuff::MapTimeHour;
}
$ServerStuff::MapTime = $ServerStuff::MapTimeHour @ ":" @ $ServerStuff::MapTimeMin @ ":" @ $ServerStuff::MapTimeSec;
SSServerTime.setValue($ServerStuff::ServerTime);
SSMapTime.setValue($ServerStuff::MapTime);
if ($ServerStuffTimeSchedule != 0) cancel($ServerStuffTimeSchedule);
$ServerStuffTimeSchedule = schedule(1000, 0, ServerStuffUpdateTime);
}

function ServerStuffReset()
{
ServerStuffUpdateHud();
error("Resetting Settings");
$ServerStuff::PingNum = 0;
$ServerStuff::CurrentPing = 0;
$ServerStuff::TotalPing = 0;
$ServerStuff::MaxPing = 0;
$ServerStuff::MinPing = 0;
$ServerStuff::AvPing = 0;
$ServerStuff::PLNum = 0;
$ServerStuff::CurrentPL = 0;
$ServerStuff::TotalPL = 0;
$ServerStuff::MaxPL = 0;
$ServerStuff::MinPL = 0;
$ServerStuff::AvPL = 0;
$ServerStuff::FPSNum = 0;
$ServerStuff::CurrentFPS = 0;
$ServerStuff::TotalFPS = 0;
$ServerStuff::MaxFPS = 0;
$ServerStuff::MinFPS = 0;
$ServerStuff::AvFPS = 0;
$ServerStuff::MapTimeSec = "0"@0;
$ServerStuff::MapTimeMin = "0"@0;
$ServerStuff::MapTimeHour = "0"@0;
}

function ServerStuffExportLog()
{
error("Exporting Log");
%SSSave = new FileObject();
%SSSave.openForWrite("logs/");
%SSSave.close();
%SSSave.openForAppend("logs/ServerStuff.log");
%SSSave.appendLine("logs/ServerStuff.log", "");
%SSSave.appendLine("logs/ServerStuff.log", "Log Date: " @ formatTimeString("mm/dd/yy") @ "\tLog Time: " @ formatTimeString("HH:nn:ss"));
%SSSave.appendLine("logs/ServerStuff.log", "Server Name: " @ $SSServerName);
%SSSave.appendLine("logs/ServerStuff.log", "Server IP: " @ $SSServerIP);
%SSSave.appendLine("logs/ServerStuff.log", "Server Map Name: " @ $SSServerMapName);
%SSSave.appendLine("logs/ServerStuff.log", "Server Map Type: " @ $SSServerMod @ " - " @ $SSServerMapType);
%SSSave.appendLine("logs/ServerStuff.log", "Lowest Ping: " @ $ServerStuff::MinPing@"/"@$ServerStuff::MinPL@"%" @ "\tLowest FPS: " @ $ServerStuff::MinFPS);
%SSSave.appendLine("logs/ServerStuff.log", "Highest Ping: " @ $ServerStuff::MaxPing@"/"@$ServerStuff::MaxPL@"%" @ "\tHighest FPS: " @ $ServerStuff::MaxFPS);
%SSSave.appendLine("logs/ServerStuff.log", "Average Ping: " @ $ServerStuff::AvPing@"/"@$ServerStuff::AvPL@"%" @ "\tAverage FPS: " @ $ServerStuff::AvFPS);
%SSSave.appendLine("logs/ServerStuff.log", "Total Time: " @ $ServerStuff::ServerTime @ "\tMap Time: " @ $ServerStuff::MapTime);
%SSSave.close();
%SSSave.delete();
ServerStuffReset();
}

function ServerStuffExportServerLog()
{
ServerStuffExportLog();
$ServerStuff::ServerTimeSec = "0"@0;
$ServerStuff::ServerTimeMin = "0"@0;
$ServerStuff::ServerTimeHour = "0"@0;
error("Closing Schedules");
if ($ServerStuffTimeSchedule != 0) cancel($ServerStuffTimeSchedule);
if ($ServerStuffFPSSchedule != 0) cancel($ServerStuffFPSSchedule);
if ($ServerStuffPingSchedule != 0) cancel($ServerStuffPingSchedule);
if ($ServerStuffPLSchedule != 0) cancel($ServerStuffPLSchedule);
error("Killing Hud");
if (isObject(ServerStuffHud))
{
playGui.remove(ServerStuffHud);
ServerStuffHud.delete();
}
}

function NetBarHud::infoUpdate(%this, %ping, %packetLoss, %sendPackets, %sendBytes, %receivePackets, %receiveBytes)
{
parent::infoUpdate(%this, %ping, %packetLoss, %sendPackets, %sendBytes, %receivePackets, %receiveBytes);
$ServerStuff::CurrentPing = mFloor(%ping);
$ServerStuff::CurrentFPS = mFloor($fps::real);
}
};
activatePackage(ServerStuff);

Example output:
Log Date: 07/04/2011   Log Time: 16:59:57
Server Name: Goon Haven
Server IP: 67.222.138.111:28000
Server Map Name: SoylentGreen
Server Map Type: classic - Capture the Flag
Lowest Ping: 48/0%   Lowest FPS: 94
Highest Ping: 167/6%   Highest FPS: 102
Average Ping: 77/0%   Average FPS: 97
Total Time: 01:26:31   Map Time: 00:18:03


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on July 16, 2011, 04:11:29 AM
A word on network settings.

If you have the ability to control certain network settings such as interrupt request moderation, it may be beneficial to game play to do so. Each network event triggers an interrupt to the cpu. The cpu must then stop doing whatever it is doing and see to that net irq. Then it can continue to do whatever it was doing before. Or in the case of smp systems, one core can handle the net irq while the other goes about its business.

The int moderation control moderates the total interrupts seen by the cpu. If the IM control is set to adaptive, the networking driver and os tcp/ip stack tracks the interrupts and when they get to a distracting level to the cpu, the network driver slows the interrupts and bundles them into a single package with one interrupt. When this happens in a game it causes lag. This lag is due to the fact that the network driver has retained net packets for a set time and then released them in a single and delayed interrupt to the cpu for processing. By the time your game gets these delayed packets they may be far too old to mean anything as the action on screen has already chamged. This interrupt moderation is a boon to overworked webservers and other servers, but not to a game client or a game server.

Immediate attention to each and every packet is what game clients and game servers need above all else as far as networking goes if that game is an online game like an fps such as Tribes. In role playing or turn based strategy games, this interrupt moderation may not be noticeable, in an fps it will be.

Many Intel based netwrok cards, both add ins and onboard, have the ability to moderate net interrupts and can have this setting changed by the user. In my case I right click networking icon on the desktop, scroll down to properties, right click the net adaptor, properties, and click the configure button. Click advanced, performance options, proiperties, interrupt moderation rate, and set it to your liking. Off should give immediate packet attention to each packet as it arrives. Adaptive should do close to the same unless there is a lot of activity coming from your network adaptor, as adaptive only impedes and bundles packets if they get too great for the cpu as determined by the adaptive algorithm. Hit ok, then close everything and your system may want to restart before serttings take place.

 Some nvidia motherboards can also bundle packets with their onboard net cards. In the case of nvid netcards, you have two choices, one is cpu and the other is network throughput. In this case set it to netwrok throughput for lowest packet latency.

Test your game with the various moderation settings and see if it helps or hurts your gaming.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on July 16, 2011, 04:33:07 AM
A word on timeslices or quanta.

Timeslices, or quanta for windows weenies,  is the time in milliseconds that a cpu is tasked to run a thread. A thread is the code that actually gets executed by the cpu. There are normaly two choices in timeslices or quanta available to a user,  adjust for best performance of programs, and adjust for best performance of background services. Now it may seem logical to spend most cpu time on programs running in the forground rather than what is being done in the background, wich means network access, disk acces, etc stuff hidden from the user. But like everything, there is a tradeoff. With set to programs, timeslices are devoted to the forground app as much as possible and only interrupted by important events such as network activity. The time in milliseconds a app may hold the attention of the cpu is what is varied here by this control.

But what happens if we set it to background apps rather than forground? An interesting thing. All actrivities get the same equal timeslice, but that timeslice is made much longer in duration than when set for programs on the desktop. Some gamers may find it a benefit to increase the duration of their app timselices as that greatly increases the total time the cpu can spend on the game thread. See, with this control set to programs, programs get priority, but a smaller timeslce is given overall. With set to background, all threads get the same increased duration timeslice. Give this control a try and see if it plays better for you.

I find this control in xp and server2003 (the os's I use) by right clicking on my computer icon, properties, advanced, performance, advanced,  click background services. You should not have to reboot for this setting alteration. In other os's I have no clue but if it is an M$ os you should be able to find the control and give it a shot. You can do the same adjustment in Linux os by renicing your app.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on July 16, 2011, 04:44:12 AM
A word on memory usage.

This is about a control that controls how the os (most any M$ os) caches data in memory. If you have much memory, you can enable this control and see a benefit in some apps. To get to this control you once again in xp and server2003 (the os's I use) by right clicking on my computer icon, properties, advanced, performance, advanced, memory usage, set it to  system cache. This setting allows the os to cache a lot of data that it would otherwise try to page to disk and clear memory for use by anything else.

The reason why we want things in memory is because of this:
Memory access is almost instantaneous, like sending an email. Disk access, where all data goes when it is paged to disk to clear memory, is like sending the same message as we sent in our above email written on paper, placed into an envelope, dropped in the mail, the postman picks it up, sends it into the mail system, and takes two months on a freighter to Nibi Nibi Island where your great uncle lives. That is exactly how a cpu sees the difference between getting data from memory and getting data from disk. So as you can see, we want as much data we are going to need in memory rather than on disk. If you don't have more than say 512mb system ram do not change this control. It can make a difference in gamiong and overall system performance.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on July 16, 2011, 04:57:53 AM
A word on disk policies.

You say you don't have a policy about disks? Well, you do now.
In talking about disk policy, we are once again talking about caching in memory, and as we learned above. data from disk is infinitely slower than the same data found in ram. So we cheat with our disks. What this means is we cheat by telling the os that yes, the data that the os requested to be written to disk was indeed written, but what we didn't tell the os was that we are holding the data to be written on the disk in the disk's cache memory untill a proper time comes along to write that data onto the hard drive. This speeds things up greatly as most disks are far slower in disk writes than disk reads. Well, how do we get this miracle cure?

Once again we right click on my computer, properties, hardware, device manager, disk drives, policies. See? Told ya you had a disk policy.

Now if you see a button marked "enable write caching on disk" check it. If you see another box marked "enable advanced performance" check it too. These allow the disk to lie to the os like I mentioned above, speeding things along.

WARNING! PELIGRO! DANGER WILL ROBINSON! ACHTUNG!

If you enable these caching mechanisms and you have a sys crash or power failure that drops the system, pretty much everything that was in cache, or any and all data that was in some form of memory when the failure occurred, that data is now lost unless it was copied to disk before the crash. Poof. Gone. Adios.

These settings are dangerous if you crash your system or have a power failure. You can lose your os install. Your boot loader. All sorts of bad things(tm) can happen. But you do get a nice boost in performance while it lasts.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on July 24, 2011, 05:55:31 AM
A word on fxaa.

Antialiasing - FXAA

FXAA is a fast shader-based post-processing technique that can be applied to any program, including those which do not support other forms of hardware-based antialiasing. FXAA can be used in conjunction with other antialiasing settings to improve overall image quality. Note that enabling this setting globally may affect all programs rendered on the GPU, including video players and the Windows desktop.

• Turn FXAA on to improve image quality with a lesser performance impact than other antialiasing settings.

• Turn FXAA off if you notice artifacts or dithering around the edges of objects, particularly around text.

http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=201821&view=findpost&p=1248230

To enable fxaa option in the control panel:
Using the Registry Editor, navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\NVIDIA Corporation\Global\NVTweak, create a DWORD value called EnableSRS1442 and set it to 1.
Then FXAA will be available in the Nvidia Control Panel.

You must have a nvid vid card and 275xx series driver to experiment with fxaa. I have tried it in Tribes and Tribes2 and it did not like either game, forcing all text and menus to the side of the screen and other odd behaviours. If you get this to work with your system, let me know what os yoiu got it working under please.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: xionc on July 26, 2011, 08:46:28 AM
I can't enable VSync, I've tried do so in game, ati tray tools, etc. Still can't enable it. Could you help me?


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on July 27, 2011, 04:50:21 AM
Hmm. That's odd. First try it in the ccc, then after making sure it is enabled in the ccc set it to enabled in game. I have an sli system playing t2 and I couldn't get it to vsynch untill after I had disabled and re-enabled vsynch in the game itself, and the in-game control has never worked for me in any other system through the years so who knows wtf is going on. T2 is weird. If that doesn't work try:

http://downloads.guru3d.com/RefreshLock-download-354.html

OR

http://downloads.guru3d.com/ATI-Tray-Tools-download-733.html

Use Rivatuner for Nvid or ati cards both:
http://downloads.guru3d.com/RivaTuner-v2.24c-download-163.html

As always, read the directions.

Refreshlock forces vsynch in every system I have tried so that may be the one you will have to use.

Let me know if you get sorted.



Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: xionc on July 31, 2011, 11:58:28 AM
I've enable Vsync in ATI-Tray-Tools and in game too. I'm also runing RefreshLock (ver 2.21). My card driver is Omega 2.6.83.

from 'clientprefs.cs':
Code:
$pref::Video::allowD3D = "1";
$pref::Video::allowOpenGL = "1";
$pref::Video::appliedPref = "1";
$pref::Video::clipHigh = "0";
$pref::Video::defaultsRenderer = "RADEON 9600 XT x86/SSE2";
$pref::Video::defaultsVendor = "ATI Technologies Inc.";
$pref::Video::deleteContext = "1";
$pref::Video::disableVerticalSync = "0";
$pref::Video::displayDevice = "OpenGL";
$pref::Video::fullScreen = "1";
$pref::Video::only16 = "1";
$pref::Video::preferOpenGL = "1";
$pref::Video::profiledRenderer = "RADEON 9600 XT x86/SSE2";
$pref::Video::profiledVendor = "ATI Technologies Inc.";
$pref::Video::resolution = "1152 864 16";
$pref::Video::safeModeOn = "0";
$pref::visibleDistanceMod = "1";


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on August 01, 2011, 05:11:14 AM
Hmm. None of that is working for you? I would try to just use one app like either tray tools or refresh lock. Also, can you run the cat 5.11 driver? The 5.11 driver was one of the best for t2 and the 9xxx class ati cards. Whenever I see someone runs a 9xxx card I say head straight for the 5.11 driver if you can use it. If not, then trying various drivers, going back in time, will probabky come up with one that works.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on August 01, 2011, 05:18:26 AM
"$pref::Video::only16 = "1";"
"$pref::Video::resolution = "1152 864 16";"

Are you running in 16bit for a reason? If so try the game and vsynch in 32bit. At your resolution the 32bit performance will be closer to that of 16bit than if you were running at say 1900x1600. The 9700 I had would do arounf 300+fps in 32bit colour in t2 in open areas, not a bad card at all, and your card is very similar to the 9700.

 I will say that ati cards almost make t2 look as good in 16bit as most other cards do in 32bit, so I can understand why one is willing to use 16bit. Also 16bit is usualy around twice as fast as 32bit in almost any card, but in most non-ati card it's so ugly it makes the game not worth playing. Matrox cards also seem to make 16bit look nice too, but they usualy have low fps even in 16bit.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: xionc on August 06, 2011, 05:59:50 AM
Still doesn't work, and changing bit depth didn't impact on fps that much, i rather don't see significant difference.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on August 09, 2011, 09:22:20 AM
Try another driver and see if that changes anything.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on August 11, 2011, 12:11:00 PM
Also, if you run the frameskippa script you will show higher fps than refresh rate, even though your vsynch is enabled.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: xionc on August 14, 2011, 10:52:40 AM
Also, if you run the frameskippa script you will show higher fps than refresh rate, even though your vsynch is enabled.
It seems like that's it. Thanks for your input.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on August 14, 2011, 01:54:10 PM
Should have mentioned that in the post re frameskippa huh.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on September 12, 2011, 09:56:11 AM
A word on services:

Services, also known as daemons in the *nix world, are background servers that perform tasks on your system. Some of them are needed so as to be able to boot, some are superfluous and unneeded by most. Some are always running, taking cpu time and memory but you never use them. So, what if we could stop these services from doing that? The less services the system needs to peridically run, the more cpu time that can be devoted to your game. That is the goal, the raison d'etre of system tuning, the kaizen of performance tweaking.
Well, you can tweak that system and here is how:

http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?displaylang=en&=tm&id=2155

Please note that the above is straight from M$, how thoughtfull of them. Now there are other tweaking guides out there to peruse as the M$ guide is likely going to be rather conservative in a bad way.

http://support.gateway.com/s/software/MICROSOF/vista/7515418/7515418su584.shtml
The above is a guide written by my favorite oem brand.

http://www.tweakhound.com/vista/tweakguide/page_8.htm
This one is more indepth.

Now, there are services you can disable that will keep your system from booting, so don't disable those. I am not at fault for you fooching your system. But there is recourse if you do fooch your system in the f8 "last known good" booting parameter.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on September 15, 2011, 11:29:10 AM
A word on netstack tuning:

You might be saying to yourself what is this netstack he speaks of? I know no netstack. Besides, what does this stack thing have to do with our beloved game? I am here to reveal your netstack to you wondering eyes and expose and expound upon its features, how you can control and adjust those features, and why you should. That being said, the benefit is hard to notice, but in a game where milliseconds (or fractions of milliseconds) can actually make a huge difference, you want the absolute lowest latency you can wring out of your game system. The hard and fast rule is the fewer protocols in the stack, the smaller and faster that stack. Simple right?

Your netstack is a block of important code that resides in memory, having been loaded there by the os (and partially by the NIC driver) at boot. This stack is the "TCP chimney" that all the incoming and outgoing packets must filter through as packets make their way to and from your system. Packets have to be identified first in the netstack, where they are welcomed, dusted off, given a snack, and introduced to your cpu, memory, or app.Really the stack checks packets as to what kind they are, check for errors to a degree, and have the data stripped from the addressing and overhead, then the data is sent to whatever app it is addressed to. This stack comprises all the networking protocols that have been installed and are available to the NIC according to the os, along with checksumming and other houskeeping duties such as firewalling and so on. They are "stacked" one upon the other like building blocks of a sort, hence the name. Durr.

These networking protocols are languages for lack of a better term. Languages such as TCPIPv4, TCPIPv6, Netbios, and etc protocols such as Simple file sharing and so on and so forth. Most of us can get along with a greatly reduced protocol list. I get along just fine with TCPIPv4 alone, but I don't need TCPIPv6 or NetBios or any file sharing protocols so they get removed from the netstack at install. If you do need these other protos, you need to make sure you do not delete them or deactivate them or your networking will be interrupted. And I am not to be blamed, as you were duly warned.

In XP and Server2003 you can load and unload the various protocols at install, wich I suggest. Oh they are always avalable for the most part as they are in some cab file in the windows folder somewhere, but removing them from the stack ensures they never take up memory or see cpu time. In Vista and 7 you can delete them at install if the os disk has the networking drivers inherent, if not you can delete them when you install the driver after os install. Under a Vista install you find these here:
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-vista/Add-or-remove-a-network-protocol-service-or-client

Like I said, the obvious lag reduction diff isn't night and day earthshakingly obvious, but it is the right thing to do, along with reducing unneeded services and all the other tuning paradigms described previously.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on September 15, 2011, 11:31:37 AM
A word on DHCP and DNS:

Leases are messy. If you are old enough to know or have a lease you know they can be messy. When your system boots up, one of the things it does, if you use DHCP and DNS to obtain an ip address from your network, is request an ip address and DNS server info from the DHCP server online, and it does this by "leasing" the ip. Keep in mind the part about leases being messy and so on, for your ip address is leased from whatever device grants it to you, and it has an expiration date of hours, days, weeks, etc. This is not bad as it saves work and simplifies administration. Imagine having to set an individual ip by hand on a few hundred systems. And what aboyt DNS services? Gatta have those to communicate on teh innernets unless you know exactly what ip address you want to connect to. DHCP/DNS are obtained upon request and when the lease is up that ip may be issued to another system, and as you might have noticed, the same system on a lan may get the same ip addy all the time from the DHCP server, as the DHCP server notices the unique mac address of each DHCP requesting system. Well, DHCP takes care of all that xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx and DNS stuff for us, but at a small price. Now if all you have is one system connected directly to a cable or dsl or fibre modem, unless your isp issues you a static ip you will have to continue using DHCP and DNS. DHCP is also needed for wireless devices, where DHCP makes life much easier.

Why would one want to stop using a perfectly good DHCP and DNS? Well, if your power company is as good as mine and you get several brownouts or even power drops per month, this often glitches networking devices such as rooters and switches, modems and all else, not to mention your poor system. The more devices you have in your lan (firewall, rooter, modem, switch, print server, etc) the more glitches you'll encounter. You can stop the effects of a lot of these issues with a UPS, Uninterruptible Power Supply that feeds ac to each device networked. The UPS kicks in when it senses low voltage or no voltage from your power company. At least that is how they are advertised. And this UPS thingy is the real cure to the glitch issue, other than moving to a place that has stable power.

Another aspect to DHCP and DNS is the length of time it takes for your system and DHCP server to negotiate an IP and DNS servers. You can eliminate this delay by setting your ip manually at your system. I usualy just look at the interface properties at the time, write down the ip address, the dns servers, and then apply them as static figures in the NIC properties sheet. That way you have an ip much sooner, usualy, and another benefit is you can then disable the DHCP server in your system, as well as DNS. Once again, these services are in your control panel, with all the other services. Going to a static ip and dns setup won't reduce lag other than reducing the amount of time after bootup to be able to use the net, but it certainly is geeky.

Here is how to go about it:
http://blog.mclaughlinsoftware.com/2009/11/26/windows-7-static-ip/

All these tuning paradigms amount to efforts at minuteia, the infinitesmal, but we all know how much difference a millisecond can make.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on September 15, 2011, 11:33:02 AM
A word on in-game network settings:

If you haven't already done so, in the game, open the options menu and select networking. If you have a form of broadband as an innerweb connection, select cable/t1 rate and set the packet size to 450 and rate to 32 or whatever the max is. If you are on a slow form of dsl or even dialup, you can still play well at dialup rates. Just set the packet size to 256 and the rate to 16, If you see lag spikes in game, set the rate to 14 but leave the size at 256 as that is more or less close to the least usefull size for decent play.

What these settings control is the rate of packets and their size, to and from the server. The rate sets the move packets per second you send to the server and gamestate updates back to your client. Higher rates reduce latency. The server will adjust the size of the packets sent to you and the rate at wich they are sent automatically. The packet size should not be set lower than 240 or so in T2, but Tribes plays fine with a size of 200. This variable netcode ability is how the server deals with guys who who are on broadband and those who are on dialup playing in the same match. The original Tribes was written to play excellently on dialup, and it does. T2 plays almost but not quite as excellently on dialup as the netcode was overhauled and some apparent latency was added, my guess is in the security features of the T2 netcode that Tribes lacks.

A word on updates:

The thinkers amongst us may be saying to themselves: So if I only get 32 packets per second from a server, 32 new update frames drawn on my screen about what is happening in the game.... where do the frames come from for the rest of the second? Well, your client is a server too and keeps track of gamestate but as a client your gamestate is not authoratative, it can interpolate some frames as needed but it can be overridden by the server as the server is all seeing, all knowing, and decides who shot first.

Say you are running at 100FPS on screen and 32pps update rate. What is being shown on your screen for the rest of those frames between the 32 updates you get? Your client as a server does a neat trick called interpolation. It applies physics to each projectile and moving object such as players and vehicles and steps them frame by frame according to their velocity and direction of travel and the ruleset of the server untill updates are received. Ruleset is the fancy name for mod. This clientside interpolation ensures a smooth game when you run more frames per second than you get updates from the server. If all you ran was 32fps you would not need interpolation, but interpolation is a safety net and a game smoother and is why players warp sometimes when your connection lags or is broken. The server sends the next update that finally gets through to your client and your client, being obedient to the server, snaps the players and vehicles and projectiles to their actual server-certified position and condition. And now you know!



Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on September 17, 2011, 01:25:29 PM
A word on consumer grade routers:

Rooters are everywhere. They run teh interwebz. And you might even use one at home. If you do and that rooter runs the Linux 2.4 kernel in its os you can reduce latency a bit by employing a rooter that runs the Linux 2.6 kernel. The 2.4 kernel is not preemptive whereas the 2.6 kernel is. Whatever the 2.4 kernel is doing before you fired that shot, it keeps on doing till it is done with whatever it was doing before it says to your fire packet "ok, now what where you saying? or at least one supposes that is how it goes. The 2.6 kernel, however, will drop whatever it was doing and perform the task requested, interrupting what it had been doing to obey your command. The diff, as usual, is not night and day but a good player will immediately notice on going from a 2.4 to a 2.6 rooter that they are much more "almost like being inside the server" than with rooters that use 2.4 or other non preemptive kernels. I usualy use DDWRT as an upgrade over any rooter that can accept it, DDWRT offers a lot of options and configurations that the normal oem os do not offer. And conveniently enough, the DDWRT site will show you what firmware is available to your rooter, and will tell you what kernel to use. Most of the N rooters I have seen are already 2.6 kernel boxes, so you are probably living well already, but if you feel like trying your hand at a different rooter os, give DDWRT or one of the others a try. If you have an older rooter that only speaks B or G you likely have a 2.4 kernel os inside. It would do you well to get a newer rooter that uses the 2.6 kernel, if you want the least response time possible in gaming. The hitch is that you can't just drop a 2.6 kernel into a 2.4 piece of hardware, at least as far as the embedded systems like rooters go. If you run a pc as a rooter and it runs Linux you should easily be able to employ a 2.6 kernel, as it is not a embedded hardware system. Embedded hardware limits what it can and can't accept as far as what code it runs, unlike a typical AMD or Intel cpu meant for use in a standard pc. Some hardware with the 2.4 kernel can be flashed to run 2.6, but these are quite rare. Besides, if you have a 2.4 rooter, this is the perfect reason to upgrade to a new rooter.

You can find out about DDWRT here:
http://www.dd-wrt.com/site/index

Now you all know how I am all about doing stuff that can fooch a system, and this one is one of them and this is your warning.If you've no experience installing firmware you might want to avoid this.  If you do not follow the instructions to the letter in how to install firmware you will likely turn your hardware into a brick. And what's a brick good for? You can hold doors open with one, throw it at someone, make a house out of them, you get the idea. But just as surely all computer and electronic devices run on smoke, if you brick your rooter it will then be as usefull as a brick. Don't think electronics run on smoke? Let the smoke out of any electronic device of your choice and see if it will run afterwards. Have fun trying to get the smoke back into your device, by the way.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on September 26, 2011, 11:42:46 AM
A word on mice and ports:

Most of us run a usb kb and mouse, right? Well, sometimes running a mouse on the ps2 port, if your system has one, will reduce latency a bit. Many mice come as usb natively but have a ps2 adapter in the box as well, if you lack a ps2 adapter go find one.  Once again, this is not a night and day thing as far as response differences go, but is something one can easily try for themselves and see how the game plays on each input. I find that ps2 is far more accurate and responsive than usb, and I presume that added inertia when running usb is due to the usb driver. Be that as it may, try it and see what you think, you may find a better game.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on October 23, 2011, 11:37:40 AM
A word on Readyboost and Superfetch
And that word, or words, is USE THEM.
These are services found in Vista and 7, and all furture M$ os will use likely them. Their roots are in XP's prefetch service, but they are much more advanced, to the point of even knowing the usual times you fire up a certain app. Use them.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/windows-vista-superfetch-and-readyboostanalyzed,1532.html

They are to your advantage.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on November 04, 2011, 07:40:59 AM
A word on game pc and game server home builds is in the works.
Stay tuned.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Heat Killer on November 16, 2011, 11:29:43 AM
A word on game pc and game server home builds is in the works.
Stay tuned.
You need to write a book.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: OldeWolfe on November 17, 2011, 07:52:04 AM
Blakhart, I just re-read this entire thread for the second time and am impressed once again with the time and effort you have put into this 'body of work'.

I have implemented a few of the changes you recommended, and I'm hoping they will prolong the gaming life of my old machine. 

Thank you very much. :D


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on November 17, 2011, 01:57:57 PM
I'm about done with the home build writeup, just a few more tidbits and it should be ready. Will have to make it an attachement as it's kinda lengthy, just as you expected. None of the game specific tips are in it as are in this thread so far, just pc build ideas. I have been specialising in keeping older systems usefull for a long time now and have it pretty much down pat. The writeup for new builds also applies to rebuilds/refreshes of older gear so I hope everyone who reads it gets something out of it. Thanks for the encouragement by the way, I appreciate it. If it wasn't for the hardcore t2 players I wouldn't have anyone with wich to share my arcane pc hobby.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on November 20, 2011, 01:44:57 PM
A word on game pc building/rebuilding

http://www.mediafire.com/?8qocii48ih1oxqg


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on December 01, 2011, 04:47:13 PM
Some words on mem timing

"Hi

"What is tRAS and why is it backwards and important at the same time?

The word latencies is generally used to describe a delay. However, Merriam-Webster defines the word’s origin as period of dormancy and in technical parlance, latency is often used to describe simply the duration of any event. One example is the PCI latency which describes the time any device has access to the PCI bus before it will be automatically disconnected to allow other devices access to the same resources.

Why are we talking about this? Very simple, the access latencies of any device to the PCI bus are usually eight cycles, but the total latency can be set from 16-256 cycles. This shows that the same word is used to describe two entirely different parameters, the first being the time until any transactions can start, the second referring to the time that is available for transactions (minus the access latencies). As an example, a PCI latency of 32 will carry a penalty (access latency) of 8 cycles which leaves 24 cycles for actual data transfers. Therefore, decreasing this latency will not increase performance, on the contrary.

The exact same is true for tRAS short for the RAS Pulse width. Historically, tRAS was defined as the time needed to establish the necessary potential between a bitline pair within the memory array until it was safe to write back the data to the memory cells of origin after a (destructive) read. Pay attention to the word read here.

Memory, in many ways is like a book, you can only read after opening a book to a certain page and paragraph within that particular page. The RAS Pulse Width is the time until a page can be closed again. Therefore, just by definition, the minimum tRAS must be the RAS-to-CAS delay plus the read latency (CAS delay). That is fine for FPM and EDO memory with their single word data transfers. With SDRAM, memory controllers started to output a chain of four consecutive quadwords on every access. With DDR, that number has increased to eight quadwords that effectively are two consecutive bursts of four.

Now imagine someone closes the book you are reading from in the middle of a sentence. Right in your face! And does it over and again. This is what happens if tRAS is set too short. So here is the really simple calculation: The second burst of four has at least to be initiated and prefetched into the output buffers (like you get a glimpse at the headline in a book) before you can close the page without losing all information. That means that the minimum tRAS would be tRCD+CAS latency + 2 cycles (to output the first burst of four and make way for the second burst in the output buffers).

Any tRAS setting lower tRCD + CAS + 2 cycles will allow the memory controller to close the page “in your face!” over and again and that will cause a performance hit because of a truncated transfer that needs to be repeated. Along with those hassles comes the self-explanatory risk for data corruption. That one is not a real problem as long as the system is kept running but in case it is shut down and the memory content is written back to the hard disk drive, the consequences can be catastrophic. For the drive, that is.

What does this spec mean?

Take for example 2.5-4-4 as the latency rating for a module. Latency is a measure of delay, that means the 2.5 rating in 2.5-4-4 indicates a 2.5 clock cycle delay. And the 4 ratings mean a 4 clock cycle delay. The clock cycle delays that these ratings are measuring is what determine how long it takes your CPU to write or remove data from memory. So the lower these latencies are, the less time your CPU spends idle waiting for data which results in higher performance.

The position of the rating in 2.5-4-4 determines what latency the rating is referring to. The ratings, in order, represent the latency ratings for CAS, tRCD (RAS-to-CAS delay), and tRP (RAS Precharge). It would take a long time to explain what each of these latency ratings means, so to make a long story short the lower the latency the higher the performance of your CPU."

What they're saying is going from 6/2/2/2 to 5/2/2/2 pretty much gaurantees eventual data loss.

Going lower than a tRAS of 6 in this case means trouble. Add the CAS to tRCD (RAS-to-CAS delay), plus 2 cycles to get the most reliable tRAS for your system.

Use memtest86 (or similar) to verify your settings are stable, allowing a few complete passes error free before you call it good."


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on December 27, 2011, 10:09:39 AM
The other day there was issue with the master server. Setting servers you play on as faves in the server browser will bypass the issue as long as the ip and port of those servers does not change.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on January 10, 2012, 09:36:12 AM
Some of the clientprefs strings settings described here apply to t2:
http://forums.legionsoverdrive.com/threads/legions-lite-tweaking.25/


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on February 12, 2012, 08:16:20 AM
Before I get accused of cheating .... again.
If you turn off the ingame sound and don't have a media player playing or other noise source while you play t2 you can easily hear someone approaching from behind pretty much no matter where you are ..... unless other game sounds are louder. So next time you try to sneak up on someone sniping from behind a mountain peak and they jump before you can lance them or whatever your plan is, they're not cheating, they heard you coming. Also, the cloak pack is pretty noisy and can be hear for a good distance, so you might think you're being sneaky but you really aren't.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: SlyUX on March 26, 2012, 07:41:28 AM
I have an intel graphics chipset 128mb in my micro PC sooo....???


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on March 30, 2012, 05:08:28 AM
Hi there. Copy this and paste it into a new tesxt file, rename it as framskippa.cs, and copy it to your gamedata/base/scripts/autoexec folder. Run t2 and go into the scripts menu, find frameskippa and set it to 2 and see if that gives you any help. You have to have support.vl2 in the gamedata/base folder to run most scripts by the way.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on June 07, 2012, 05:55:31 PM
Just tried the 301.42 driver from nvid and the fxaa antialiasing mode now works in both t1 and t2 games. What this does is give you almost 4x antialiasing image quality without the performance hit. For cards with performance issues or to decrease latency it might be a good idea to get this driver and use the fxaa mode rather than fsaa or msaa. This is for Nvidia cards only. Works in other games as well. Games looked fine to me and no anomalies noted other than text was a little blurred unlike with fxaa forced in the 275 driver wich was a disaster.

http://www.geforce.com/drivers


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on June 11, 2012, 02:49:17 AM
More on fxaa:

http://timothylottes.blogspot.com/2011/03/nvidia-fxaa.html
http://developer.download.nvidia.com/assets/gamedev/files/sdk/11/FXAA_WhitePaper.pdf

"If you have a GeForce card you might want to grab the latest batch of beta drivers from the Nvidia site. Nvidia say they’ll deliver a performance boost in Skyrim of up to 20%, which is nice, but the Nvidia FXAA functionality is perhaps a more interesting addition. That’ll allow us to force a faster form of anti-aliasing across hundreds of games from the Nvidia control panel. The new shader-based antialiasing function should help to smooth out edges at speeds “60% faster than 4xMSAA.”

The new drivers also add Adaptive Vsync. This monitors your framerates and switches vsync off when they start to dip, helping to maintain a consistent framerate with less stuttering."
http://www.pcgamer.com/2012/04/10/nvidia-drivers-boost-skyrim-add-fxaa-shaders-adaptive-vsync-and-other-fancy-bits/


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on July 04, 2012, 06:14:08 AM
A word on dialup play:
If you are on dialup all is not lost. T1 was written to be played and played well at dialup rates. T2 is the descendant of T1 and shares this ability. To go a bit further than just setting the in game networking menu tab to 56k you can go into clientprefs.cs (found in GameData\base\prefs) and edit these lines after saving the original somehere safe in case you fooch things up:

$pref::Net::PacketRateToClient = "32"; //if ping starts to run away set to 20 or 16
$pref::Net::PacketRateToServer = "16"; //if ping starts to run away set to 14
$pref::Net::PacketSize = "200"; //this one is very important, set no higher than 256 when on dialup

The above is for dialup only. The downlink from the server to you offers more bandwidth than the uplink so try to run at 32, if the game still lags or ping increases after a time and stays that way reduce the rate to client to 29 or so. Reduce it a bit at a time till you find the max rate your modem can handle. Do the same for the uplink side, I find that 14 is about all a modem can handle, 16 may cause a ping race condition where it just gets higher and higher. Edit, save, serve, enjoy. You can use notepad to edit .cs files, but I prefer Tribal IDE found here:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/tribalide/


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: rJay on July 21, 2012, 07:07:23 AM
Dude. This is SO FREAKIN' helpful, that you need to have it penned. Thx so much!
rJay

EDIT: I meant pinned. :)


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on September 23, 2012, 12:41:54 PM
"I have an intel graphics chipset 128mb in my micro PC sooo...."

In light of the above specs and what they represent to the game we love, just keep in mind that t2 had as best possible target card a nvid gf3 - wich is a dx8 class card, so most onboard grafix devices made in the last few years should have similar or superior performance to the gf3 target card. T2 doesn't take a whole lot of card memory, and only about 60mb system memory use, it's a low spec game compared to what passes for 3d fps games today. The beauty of running t2 on newer video devices is that the raw processing and memory speed of the newer vid devices allows us to enable image quality enhancements that t2 sorely needs. Enhancments such as fsaa/msaa/fxaa and anisotropic filtering as I mentioned in the first posts of this thread. They make what the game devs gave us look the best they can. In the past, enabling these options would make vid cards crawl, but today most video output devices laugh at t2 texturing demands. So if you're not running a tnt2 or rage128, go ahead and enable them, t2 needs all the help it can get.

Specs on gf3 cards for those geeky enough:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GeForce_3_Series


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on December 07, 2012, 10:54:30 AM
A word on t2 and windows 8.


I have it on good authority that t2 does indeed play on 8, so hope is not lost for those with 8 systems. How it gets installed and started up I have no clue, however.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Heat Killer on December 07, 2012, 04:54:25 PM
A word on t2 and windows 8.


I have it on good authority that t2 does indeed play on 8, so hope is not lost for those with 8 systems. How it gets installed and started up I have no clue, however.
Who's your authority? :P


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on December 08, 2012, 11:11:14 AM
Someone who plays t2!


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: rJay on December 09, 2012, 07:50:25 AM
:)


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on June 07, 2013, 10:23:19 AM
A word on nvidia game profiles:
Game profiles are applets commonly found in most any current vid card control panel, at least those cards intended by the maker to have sufficient performance to play games. They provide for the ability to have separate game profiles for each game, and for the desktop as well. The desktop profile is the global setting, so you know. Anyway, these profile thingys are awesome since you no longer have to go and change vid card settings between games (if you did in the past) as the pc will alter them accordingly whenever you fire up the game or app or whatever you have made a game profile for. For instance, I can have the trheaded optimisation enabled in Tribes1, but in tribes2 it results in noticeable game stutter. So T1 can have it enabled and T2 can have it disabled and all I have to do is fire up either game.



Here is my example nvidia t2 profile:
(please keep in mind I am after image quality over fps in the following example)

Anisotropic Filtering; 16
Antialiasing-Gamma Correction; on
Antialiasing Mode; Override
Antialiasing Setting; 2
Antialiasing Transparency; Supersampling
Conformant Texture Clamp; Use Hardware
Error Reporting; Off
Extension Limit; Off
Maximum pre-rendered frames; 2
Multi-display/Mixed-GPU acceleration; Single display performance
Power Management mode; Prefer maximum power
Texture filtering-Anisotropic sample optimisation; Off
Texture filtering-Negative LOD bias; Clamp
Texture filtering-Quality; High quality
Texture filtering-Trilinear optimisation; Off
Threaded optimisation; Off
Triple buffering; Off
Vertical synch; Force on



Now if I was after fps I would set the game profile up thusly:

FXAA; On
Anisotropic Filtering; 16
Antialiasing-Gamma Correction; off
Antialiasing Mode; Off
Antialiasing Setting; 2
Antialiasing Transparency; Off
Conformant Texture Clamp; Use Hardware
Error Reporting; Off
Extension Limit; Off
Maximum pre-rendered frames; 2
Multi-display/Mixed-GPU acceleration; Single display performance
Power Management mode; Prefer maximum power
Texture filtering-Anisotropic sample optimisation; On
Texture filtering-Negative LOD bias; Clamp
Texture filtering-Quality; High performance
Texture filtering-Trilinear optimisation; On
Threaded optimisation; Off
Triple buffering; Off
Vertical synch; Force off

If your game profile does not provide for FXAA simply use the antialiasing settings in my good image quality example at the top there, but use msaa rather than ssaa, and from there down use the options after antialiasing in the high performance example.



Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on July 25, 2013, 01:28:04 PM
A word on cable Modems;

Cable innernets service is based upon the last come best served algorithm (lol). What that means is if your modem has been up for days, weeks, months, it has fallen to the back of the line as far as bandwidth and latency goes. The cable co is spreading the available bandwidth around to their oversubscribed customers with this mechanism. Oversubscription is where say you're an isp and you have bandwidth for say half the city at any one time. Well, half the city is likely doing other things than horsing around on the innernets, so everything runs ok and the customer never notices a slowdown, the company saves money on bandwidth, etc, untill more than half of the people get on line. Then everyone slows down. But with the last come best served algo, the last guy whose modem synched with the cable co will get best service till someone else comes along and bumps him down the line by resetting their modem. So, when gaming is important, it may pay to unplug the coax cable from the modem and let it sit till the synch lights and the rest go out, then plug back in. You will then be top dog at the cable isp service, at least for a while.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on November 29, 2013, 07:57:33 AM
A word on OS updates.
If you have your system, regardless of what OS you run, set to automatically update itself you may want to consider changing that setting. There have been instances where a system has automatically updated and then at the next boot the system failed and a bootloader had to be installed to recover the OS. One way around such issues is to set the system to inform you when updates are available buit do not install them. Then after the update has been out a few days or weeks and no mass reports of failure due to the update you might consider it safe to now update. If an update comes along and it fooches everyones systems you might want to not install that update. You don't have to feel bad for letting a few million others beta test all OS updates for you, consider them a blessing! Some update issues are hardware related to having specific hardware installed in any given update-problem system such as mobo or disk or even cpu, some update issues to specific OS settings. Regardless, when your system is fooched it is no fun. Just an idea and yes this stems from a recent (and past) OS update issue.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on February 03, 2014, 11:06:17 AM
A word in fine tuning the netstack;

"Because multimedia programs require more resources, the Windows networking stack implements a throttling mechanism to restrict the processing of non-multimedia network traffic to 10 packets per millisecond."

The above may indicate your os is limiting your gaming needlessly.

"By default, the value for the NetworkThrottlingIndex registry entry is set to 10. When the NetworkThrottlingIndex registry entry does not exist, the behavior resembles the default behavior. Network throttling can be completely turned off by setting the value to FFFFFFFF (hexadecimal). You must restart the computer after you make a change to the value of the NetworkThrottlingIndex registry entry."

Nice M$ provided a means around this issue.

"HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Multimedia\SystemProfile\
Name : NetworkThrottlingIndex
Value type : DWORD
Value data : From integer 1 through integer 70 (Decimal) (Decimal) "

The above is the regkey to look for.

So in summary;
Open regedit as admin
Find: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Multimedia\SystemProfile
Set value to FFFFFFFF, wich results in 0xFFFFFFFF displayed to the right of the entry, default value is 10.
Reboot

This is for Windows Vista, 7, etc and has offered at least some relief in lag spikes to some users.
Use at own risk, fooling around in registry can cost you if you don't know what you are doing or follow syntax.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on July 22, 2014, 05:47:45 AM
A word on in-game issues;

If your game decides to go from full screen to windowed on its own, there may be an app trying to get focus running in the background. In such a case you might want to shut down any apps other than the game and see if that helps. Also, make sure you're not hitting keys by mistake whilst playing, making wierdness happen in the game.
For example, when I go to throw the flag I often toss a grenade, set my invo pref to medium armor antiaircraft turret pack, and never drop the flag - all due to my fat fumblefingers.

When faced with "lag" in game, make sure nothing else that could use the network is running when the game is running, or live with it. Otherwise see if the server is showing packet loss on your connection. If so, that isn't created by the server, it's a network issue. If it was a server or near-to-the-server networking issue everyone in the server would show packet loss and a high ping. To find out where that issue resides do a tracert;
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traceroute
Or do it the fun way;
http://www.d3tr.de/
This is an excellent networking tool, one of my favs and of course it's free.

So say you find some packet loss in your isp, well you can contact your isp and inform them of it and they might fix it. If it's outside your isp there's little to be done save for waiting for the net weather to change.
Innernet weather;
http://www.internetweathermap.com/
http://www.internettrafficreport.com/

If there's no packet loss or high or wandering ping, the "lag" issue likely resides in your system, something is upsetting the game and you need to find out what it is. (This barring any physical issues such as hot cpu or vid card, corrupt drive or memory, faulty mobo, or flaky psu.) Task manager is good for that, as are any number of other tools that do the same job.
Here's a fancy tool you can dl and use to investigate what's running on your pc;
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896653.aspx

Also, do a virus/malware scan with updated signatures so you can rule out someone's n0t 5te4l1n yu0r m3g4hurtz lulz.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on August 15, 2014, 06:13:15 AM
Some copy/paste clientprefs settings to try;

These go inside your clientprefs.cs file, simply copy/paste them directly into the file. First make a backup of your existing clientprefs in case you mess things up.

$pref::OpenGL::textureTrilinear = "1";
Copy paste intact.
The above tells t2 to do trilinear filtering on the game, makes for nicer image quality and doesn't hurt performance
This one isn't found in standard t2 clientprefs so you add this one to the file intact..

$pref::OpenGL::maxHardwareLights = "8";
Edit in prefs, it's already there.
If you have a recent vid card meaning in the last ten years or so you can bump the max hardware lights up to 8, this makes pretty lights render faster, most people have this set to 4 or less. This one is already in t2 so change the 4 or whatever it is to 8. Most recent (meaning the last ten years or so) vid cards seem to have a cap on 8 hardware lights.

$pref::sceneLighting::cacheLighting = 4;
Edit in prefs, it's already there.
This pref tells t2 to use the best image quality detail in scene lighting, set it to 4 wich is its max, the game comes with it set to 0.

$pref::sceneLighting::terrainGenerateLevel = 4;
Edit in prefs, it's already there.
This pref tells t2 to use the best image quality detail in terrain generation, set it to 4 wich is its max, the game comes with it set to 0.

$pref::TS::detailAdjust = "5";
Edit in prefs, it's already there.
This setting tells t2 how far away to make images at their best detail, it's set to 0 in default t2 installs meaning you don't get best detail unless you're right next to something. I set mine to 700 (wich hopefully is beyond the normal map fogging distance) and am enjoying much more detail, look at the detail on players after you change this setting, you should notice a definite improvement.
One effect is there's no more texture "popping" from low detail to highest when one gets closer to in game entities.
For example, the stone arches in circle of stones will no longer pop back and forth from low detail to high. This may reduce vid card memory traffic as the max detail textures are loaded and kept there rather than low detail and then popping to high detail as one draws near the object and vice versa.

All of these came from torque engine discussions at garage games forum, wich was founded by the guys who made t1 and t2 and starseige and a mess of other games. Torque is the t2 engine, wich is based on darkstar, the t1 engine.
And now you know!


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on August 16, 2014, 06:54:23 PM
A word on smp.

Symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) involves a symmetric multiprocessor system hardware and software architecture where two or more identical processors connect to a single, shared main memory, have full access to all I/O devices, and are controlled by a single operating system instance that treats all processors equally, reserving none for special purposes. Most multiprocessor systems today use an SMP architecture. In the case of multi-core processors, the SMP architecture applies to the cores, treating them as separate processors.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symmetric_multiprocessing




Now, the game loop in T2 is single threaded, it runs as a loop through the/a core once each frame and the results are displayed, to your horror or delight, upon your screen.... and up untill the mid 2000s all was normaly well and good in cpu land as to cache thrashing and context shifts, resulting in smooth gameplay.

But in the last few years smp (multicore) systems have become the norm rather than the rarity they once were. This multicore emergence has benefited computing as a whole...... but not older games utilising a single thread that were written when the typical home pc had a single core.

What happens when you run a latency-sensitive single threaded app (such as t1 and t2) on a multicore system is the os decides via a program called a scheduler what app to run, on what core to run it, and for how long and at what priority. Keep in mind the part about latency-sensitive apps, most apps can tolerate a lot of latency resulting from running on an smp system, sadly most fps games are not in that category.

This multicore latency usualy results from an os that really doesn't care about what app runs on what core and when.
If the app needed to be run and a core was available, the os would delete the app from the core it presently was cached in and run it on the available one, having to load the new cores cache and so on in preparation to running that app.

This core/cache thrashing presents a lot of ways latency can be increased, even if those latencies are billionths of a second. So to reduce the latency and performance hit, rational schedulers were developed that attempted to keep the same app on the same core, vastly reducing cache thrashing and context shifts and memory bus traffic and so on and so forth.

Things are much better since Vista (if you run M$ os), wich introduced to the commodity pc world the idea of a per processer run queue (inherited from Server2003) where the scheduler keeps (or tries to) an app in the same core(s) as much as possible and distributes the apps to all cores. However there are still things that can hamper that nice run queue such as another app at higher priority coming up that must be serviced by an already busy core running a lower priority app, meaning there will still be cache thrashing and memory bus traffic and context shifts.
Wich means latency is reduced from yesteryears os but not to the point a gamer would be unable to notice.
But all is not lost.
There are tools to reduce this such as imgconfig or batch files that can tell the os to use only one core and specify what core. These tools can be found in TN's faq section. So try those if you've a smp system and see if it improves your game.

For true nerds;
Scheduling;
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scheduling_(computing)

Cache thrashing;
http://pomozok.wordpress.com/2011/11/29/cpu-cache-thrashing/

Context switching;
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Context_switch

Ring levels;
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CPU_modes


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: GeEkOfWiReS1097 on August 19, 2014, 07:13:10 PM
SLI
If you have an sli system, meaning two or more vid cards installed (and I am talking nvid here as I have no experience with ati cards running crossfire), you can play t2 with sli enabled. You must enable sli in your control panel, and then go down and set the sli mode, either split frame rendering or alternating frame rendering. Split frame seems to offer more instant response to input from ouse and kb than alternate frame, and that is odd since split frame causes a lot more communication between the vid cards, meaning more latency is added, than if run in alternating frame mode. Pick one mode and see how it plays for you.
I've found that using either of SLI's frame modes on my Dual EVGA Superclocked Geforce GTX 660s will have black screen flickering if I use either of them. I'll retry in the near future, but I'd rather have visibility than flickering when going for the game winning cap... because it would be a major issue to convulse and have a seizure right as go to aim for the flag stand.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Ragora on August 19, 2014, 11:27:39 PM
But all is not lost.
There are tools to reduce this such as imgconfig or batch files that can tell the os to use only one core and specify what core. These tools can be found in TN's faq section. So try those if you've a smp system and see if it improves your game.

For Linux users (like me), Plexor in the Linux thread (http://www.tribesnext.com/forum/index.php?topic=2095.msg26301#msg26301) suggested using the "taskset" command when running the game under WINE to force it to a single core. Otherwise it seems to crash eventually anyway.

If one is using PlayOnLinux, then they should have PlayOnLinux create a shortcut on their desktop and edit the shortcut to include the taskset command, at least that's how I always did it when I needed PlayOnLinux.

Not sure if this will fix the issue, but try running tribes on a single processor core:
Code:
taskset 0x00000001 wine Tribes2.exe -online


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: GeEkOfWiReS1097 on August 20, 2014, 06:37:50 AM
Okay, so I tried SLI again...
Screen flickering occurs on the login... and goes away after completing login.
The game begins to load...
And then the screen goes black and the infamous Windows Error ding goes off. Nvidia display is unable to continue and must close the application.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on August 20, 2014, 06:38:15 AM
SLI
If you have an sli system, meaning two or more vid cards installed (and I am talking nvid here as I have no experience with ati cards running crossfire), you can play t2 with sli enabled. You must enable sli in your control panel, and then go down and set the sli mode, either split frame rendering or alternating frame rendering. Split frame seems to offer more instant response to input from ouse and kb than alternate frame, and that is odd since split frame causes a lot more communication between the vid cards, meaning more latency is added, than if run in alternating frame mode. Pick one mode and see how it plays for you.
I've found that using either of SLI's frame modes on my Dual EVGA Superclocked Geforce GTX 660s will have black screen flickering if I use either of them. I'll retry in the near future, but I'd rather have visibility than flickering when going for the game winning cap... because it would be a major issue to convulse and have a seizure right as go to aim for the flag stand.

One thing you can try is to set everything to off in the driver control panel, using the t2 game profile that you've of course made by now. Meaning antialiasing and anisotropic filtering is disabled, pretty much everything disabled. Then see if sli works in either mode. Then try with vsynch enabled. Also try with threaded optimisation off and on. Then start adding aniso and antialiasing untill it gets wonky again.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: GeEkOfWiReS1097 on August 20, 2014, 07:54:56 AM
SLI
If you have an sli system, meaning two or more vid cards installed (and I am talking nvid here as I have no experience with ati cards running crossfire), you can play t2 with sli enabled. You must enable sli in your control panel, and then go down and set the sli mode, either split frame rendering or alternating frame rendering. Split frame seems to offer more instant response to input from ouse and kb than alternate frame, and that is odd since split frame causes a lot more communication between the vid cards, meaning more latency is added, than if run in alternating frame mode. Pick one mode and see how it plays for you.
I've found that using either of SLI's frame modes on my Dual EVGA Superclocked Geforce GTX 660s will have black screen flickering if I use either of them. I'll retry in the near future, but I'd rather have visibility than flickering when going for the game winning cap... because it would be a major issue to convulse and have a seizure right as go to aim for the flag stand.

One thing you can try is to set everything to off in the driver control panel, using the t2 game profile that you've of course made by now. Meaning antialiasing and anisotropic filtering is disabled, pretty much everything disabled. Then see if sli works in either mode. Then try with vsynch enabled. Also try with threaded optimisation off and on. Then start adding aniso and antialiasing untill it gets wonky again.
Brought it to bare bones and tried both profiles to no avail.
Looks like T2 will remain single-carded. I knew I got it to work on my previous Windows 7 install, but why it fails now is beyond me.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Ragora on August 20, 2014, 10:26:55 AM
SLI
If you have an sli system, meaning two or more vid cards installed (and I am talking nvid here as I have no experience with ati cards running crossfire), you can play t2 with sli enabled. You must enable sli in your control panel, and then go down and set the sli mode, either split frame rendering or alternating frame rendering. Split frame seems to offer more instant response to input from ouse and kb than alternate frame, and that is odd since split frame causes a lot more communication between the vid cards, meaning more latency is added, than if run in alternating frame mode. Pick one mode and see how it plays for you.
I've found that using either of SLI's frame modes on my Dual EVGA Superclocked Geforce GTX 660s will have black screen flickering if I use either of them. I'll retry in the near future, but I'd rather have visibility than flickering when going for the game winning cap... because it would be a major issue to convulse and have a seizure right as go to aim for the flag stand.

One thing you can try is to set everything to off in the driver control panel, using the t2 game profile that you've of course made by now. Meaning antialiasing and anisotropic filtering is disabled, pretty much everything disabled. Then see if sli works in either mode. Then try with vsynch enabled. Also try with threaded optimisation off and on. Then start adding aniso and antialiasing untill it gets wonky again.
Brought it to bare bones and tried both profiles to no avail.
Looks like T2 will remain single-carded. I knew I got it to work on my previous Windows 7 install, but why it fails now is beyond me.

Shouldn't matter much anyway unless it's a hassle to disable the necessary stuff just to run Tribes 2 and to re-enable afterwards. I mean, Tribes 2 was built for systems running P3's and I'm sure whatever video card you're running with SLI is way more powerful than anything they had available to consumers at the time Tribes 2 was released, so running on just one shouldn't even yield a difference for such an old game.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on August 20, 2014, 10:54:58 AM
Try another driver?


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: GeEkOfWiReS1097 on August 20, 2014, 03:04:32 PM
I get 300 FPS, so it really isn't a hassle.
I'd rather not go through another driver swaparoo. Last time I did that, my primary card blew for reasons unknown.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on September 03, 2014, 08:49:07 AM
A word on Excluded File Types and Locations

The other day my game refused to let me play in scp due to the anitcheat not being installed. That was odd as I have it installed and played previously. Geek of wires asked what av I use and I replied ms essentials and he said to check the excluded file types and locatiuons list, as a recent update to ms essentials possibly deleted/edited the list. And so it was, re-adding t2 to the list made the game playable. So if you suddenly find that you can no longer play when you've played before, check the excluded files list in your av. All praise emails should go to geek, all cash and/or pc parts should be sent to me.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on September 03, 2014, 08:59:30 AM
A word on the game minimising by itself

Try this if you have win 7 or 8;
Open Task Manager and find: "wermgr.exe" (this is Windows Error Reporting Manager)
Press the start button and look for "Choose how to report problems", select it, select "Never check for solutions", close the menu
This may help.
If it doesn't, reenable this function.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on September 06, 2014, 08:57:19 AM
A word on sound glitches

So you're playing and you hit the jet button and suddenly instead of the usual jet sound you hear KPSHHHHHHHHHH maybe for as long as you have the jet button down. It may even happen when you obs someone jetting.
I'm confident this issue stems from t2 being run on a multicore pc, and you can reduce or eliminate the issue by setting t2's affinity to one core. The sound routine in t2 doesn't like to be thrashed from one core to another, especially when jetting apparently.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on October 15, 2014, 01:12:37 PM
A note on the price of onboard sound.

Years ago I read that a good soundcard, meaning one that offloaded audio processing from the cpu, was worth around 300fps in games with a 3GHz cpu system compared to the same game with onboard, non hardware-accelerated sound, ie, ac97 audio codecs. This has stuck in my mind since, and became especially apparent after losing my soundblaster live 5.1 card in an os update or some other issue. No matter what I did the sound card wouldn't make sound. So I surrendered to the problem and uninstalled the live, enabled the onboard hidef audio in bios and installed its driver.

Sound enabled, but at what price?

My real issue stems from the fact that vista, wich I run on the game box as I am cheap, has never had real official sblive 5.1 support in drivers. Some websites devoted to modded drivers came up with a solution;
http://www.ngohq.com/modded-nvmixer-and-creative-driver/571-ngo-creative-modded-driver-for-sb-live-and-audig.html

So I used that driver and it worked fine for years untill the dread event wich claimed my hardware accelerated sound.
I run a live 5.1 since it, as the father of the legendary audigy card, has a emu 10k1 chip meaning decent hardware accelerated audio and a low noise floor. Also I have like a box of them somewhere and I am cheap to a fault.

So back to the issue with onboard sound.
The sound was fine for the most part but I could definitely see the price of that onboard sound was less smooth gameplay. Much twitchier, stuttery, very noticeable in t2. And audio glitches, not only in games but also in mp3 playing. Wtf is this crap, this is touted as hidef audio.

Anyway on a whim I decided to uninstall and disable the onboard sound and try another sblive card from the box.
Got the system up and installed the ngo sblive driver - but not without issue.
After installing the driver and rebooting, the driver was missing, the system was complaining, and I was pissed. So I went into device manager and told the sblive to update its driver by pointing it to the folder that the ngo driver installation routine had left on the c drive. Lo and behold it took and hardware accelerated, low noise floor sound was back, along with creamysmooth gameplay and nonglitching mp3 audio. Yay!

So, if you want the smoothest gameplay and are using onboard sound, you might consider an add in card, the payoff is better gameplay and maybe mp3 audio.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: rJay on October 16, 2014, 11:21:39 AM
You may believe your thread goes unnoticed. It has actually helped a lot. Thought I'd let you know.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Thyth on October 16, 2014, 07:54:41 PM
FYI, scheduling latency isn't the cause of issues with T2 on symmetric-multi-processing systems. Rather, it's the use of the CPU internal time stamp counter (RDTSC instruction). Some multi-processing systems don't make any attempt to keep time stamps synchronized between execution units (especially because it's just intended as a tick count, and not a high precision timer). Switching T2 to use HPET instead via the setPerfCounterEnable() script function resolves this issue because it actually uses a purpose specific high precision timer for the simulation.

The lack of synchronization of RDTSC results in the simulation jumping forward/backward in time which manifests as the jitter/latency. Cross execution context switches don't have a user noticeable impact.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on October 17, 2014, 01:19:37 PM
I think the setPerfCounterEnable() code was added to the engine in an update before hpet was released.
Be that as it may here it is enabled;
SetPerfCounterEnable(1);

and disabled;
SetPerfCounterEnable(0);

Try them both and see what way the game plays best. If you don't have the script already, just copy the string and name it timescalecheat.cs or something and place it into your base/scripts/autoexec folder.

I've no clue if this twitchyness was first noticed on dual Athlon and Pentium systems after that specific t2 update or before, but I'm pretty certain Pentium/Athlon systems didn't have hpet as many systems have today, wich could explain why having it enabled on Pentium or Athlon dualies would make the game jitter. Also, it wouldn't surprise me if scheduling had at least some influence on the matter. Few players had dual systems back in the day so it could have gone unnoticed for several years by the vast majority of players. It also has an effect upon servers not just clients. Add the file to your server and try it enabled and disabled to see if you can get creamy smoothness from, your server. Systems without hpet will want to run it disabled, hpet systems will likely run better with it enabled, just like clients.

To see if you have hpet in client or server in a windows system just look in your device manager/system devices. If present and activated it will show up in that list. Also you may have to check to see if it's enabled in bios, check the manual for your motherboard for details. This is for Vista and newer, Vista being first M$ OS to have hpet support. It may show up in device manager on xp systems and Server2003 but xp has no driver for it and won't use the timer.... so might as well disable it in bios for all systems running xp.

For fine tuning xp and 2k systems you might try the following;
"/usepmtimer
 The /usepmtimer switch specifies that the Windows XP operating system or the Windows Server 2003 operating system use the PM-TIMER timer settings instead of the Time Stamp Counter (TSC) timer settings if the processor supports the PM_TIMER settings.

 For more information about how to use the /usepmtimer switch, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
 895980

 Programs that use the QueryPerformanceCounter function may perform poorly in Windows Server 2003 and in Windows XP"

The above involves fooling around in the boot.ini, where you should be careful about poking around in its tender innards.

Also on a like note, check the status of any "threaded optimisation" in your vid card driver control panel if such is present.
Play the game with it enabled and disabled to see how it plays, then lock it down if one setting proves better than the other.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: GeEkOfWiReS1097 on October 19, 2014, 12:29:26 PM
Yeah, I can agree about the onboard audio drivers... I've moved over to the HDMI audio that comes with my Graphics card. Noticeable difference.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on November 08, 2014, 09:24:24 AM
Okay, so I tried SLI again...
Screen flickering occurs on the login... and goes away after completing login.
The game begins to load...
And then the screen goes black and the infamous Windows Error ding goes off. Nvidia display is unable to continue and must close the application.

Kinda late for it but I just remembered there are several sli modes in nvid card setups to test. I had dual 7800gts and the game ran fine in any sli mode, so if you have issues try another mode, you'll find SLI performance mode in the driver control panel.
My system showed a bit of latency difference between the modes so try them all and see what plays best for you.
Here's a writeup on the various sli modes;
http://hexus.net/tech/reviews/graphics/916-nvidias-sli-an-introduction/?page=2


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: GeEkOfWiReS1097 on November 08, 2014, 05:15:25 PM
Okay, so I tried SLI again...
Screen flickering occurs on the login... and goes away after completing login.
The game begins to load...
And then the screen goes black and the infamous Windows Error ding goes off. Nvidia display is unable to continue and must close the application.

Kinda late for it but I just remembered there are several sli modes in nvid card setups to test. I had dual 7800gts and the game ran fine in any sli mode, so if you have issues try another mode, you'll find SLI performance mode in the driver control panel.
My system showed a bit of latency difference between the modes so try them all and see what plays best for you.
Here's a writeup on the various sli modes;
http://hexus.net/tech/reviews/graphics/916-nvidias-sli-an-introduction/?page=2
Yeah, I went through each SLI mode and no dice. Each either tears terribly or the screen spazzes too much to even understand what I'm doing.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on November 15, 2014, 09:54:02 AM
A word on monitor color temperature.

If your monitor seems to be weak in color you might try adjusting the color temperature control, most every monitor will have them, crt, lcd, etch a sketch, etc. Going from a 1080p monitor to an old 1440x900 lcd reveals the weak color rendering of the lcd to a surpising amount in my case. This control can be of benefit esdpecially for older monitors, or monitors not adjusted to the users desires. I find a setting of either "native" or "cool" being best in my 1440x900 lcd case.

Here's some further info on what it is and how to do it;
http://www.eizoglobal.com/library/basics/color_temperature_on_an_LCD_monitor/
http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/
http://ninedegreesbelow.com/photography/srgb-bad-monitor-profile.html
http://www.imaging-resource.com/ARTS/MONCAL/CALIBRATE.HTM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SRGB


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on November 28, 2014, 09:17:33 AM
A word on router firmware replacements.

If you'd like more control over you rooter, or simply to have functions the stock firmware doesn't expose or even have, you might be able to replace that firmware with some that does. Please keep in mind this depends upon if your specific rooter/version is supported by a replacement or not, of course.
There are three main players in rooter firmware replacements; ddwrt, tomato, and openwrt. These can be broken down into forks where coders have taken the basics of the firmware and added features they desired and have updated them over time, much like the linux os has been updated and maintained. Most of the firmwares will have a searchable db of rooter models they are known to support.

For ease of installation I recomend ddwrt, ddwrt may have firmwares for more models of rooter than most any other alternative firmware, and has many of the most desired features in a home rooter even in hardware-limited (meaning low flash memory and ram and/or cpu/radio chipset issues) rooters.
http://www.dd-wrt.com/site/index

Next, and my personal fav, is tomato. Very clean, lightweight, it seems to use least cpu time for operation than the others on the same rooter with the same settings. Has settings to provide for hardware defaults for output power and ack timing rather than arbitrary figures or no ability to allow the hardware to run at its designed in parameter.
http://tomatousb.org/

Openwrt is for the true linux geek, cmd line all the way. Well, maybe with some winscp help every once in a while. This firmware may offer the greatest challenge to get into operation as desired, so keep that in mind when choosing a firmware.
https://openwrt.org/

Pick a firmware, see if your rooter model and version number is supported (version number is very very very important) and if so, google that firmware and your specific rooter and version and see if there are any hangups noted in the google responses. If you choose to replace your rooters firmware, please use a ups (uninterruptible power supply) when flashing your rooter. When flashing, a power failure at pc or rooter or likely both can brick your rooter. And what's a brick good for?

Some helpfull vids;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yvmAJn1UIME
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1GjZedUlbg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMWxLyFOXN4


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on December 03, 2014, 01:24:25 PM
A word on TV and TA...

If you play either of these versions of Tribes you might be interested in some tweak apps to tweak your game a bit. Tweak meaning in this case visual image quality or fps enhancing tweaks.

For TV there's the game of course;
http://tribesrevengeance.com/
If you already have the game installed you can use this dll to get it going with the new master server;
http://tribesrevengeance.com/downloads/revengeance/Engine.dll
And for TV image quality tweaking there's the TV ini editor wich has disappeared from innernets but I can email a copy to any interested. Otherwise if you know what you're doing you can simply find the inis and edit them by hand.

For TA you've got this tool;
http://www.paullinebarger.net/files/TAAGC.zip

It helps to know what you're doing when editing inis, and it's a good idea to make backups before you go atweaking.
Here's some food for tweaking thought;
http://www.reddit.com/r/Tribes/comments/1ga241/ini_compilation_thread/


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on December 08, 2014, 11:42:33 AM
A word on innernet warfare;

If your innernets is acting slow, your region, or the entire world, may be fighting a cyberwar. To see if you're under attack simply view this page;
http://www.akamai.com/html/technology/dataviz1.html
Well, it won't tell you if you're under attack specifically, just what countries are experiencing attacks. There's also a generic latency display and useage display for your enjoyment.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on December 14, 2014, 06:14:20 AM
A word on egos and online gaming;

There are several online personalities that frequent t2 servers that have anger and ego issues. You know who they are. Most of them will end up with twice or more the score of any normal player every single map - wich should tell all that something is wrong - and will still complain when their team loses. They will also blame their team for the loss and not accept the fact that they were, yes indeed, defeated along with their team. While I'm pretty sure these asshats are literaly cheating their asses off, there's some deep psych issues here. To the asshats I say this is you;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJye229QbVs
This is what you look like.




If you think yourself unfortunate to have to face them every time you play, just consider the sad fate of their friends and family.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: rJay on December 14, 2014, 12:04:38 PM
Oh, I agree! 100%


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on January 14, 2015, 11:51:53 AM
A word on qos;

If you have a router that supports even rudimentary qos (quality of service) you may be able to improve your gaming, especially in a net where there are several users concurrently active such as is the case in the typical home. If there is a qos feature in the router, you can enable it if disabled (wich is the default state in some routers) and then check the classifications section for qos to see what is there by default. The classifications will show something like protocol tcp/udp, tcp only, udp only, etc etc and may give names to each service such as p2p and so on. There may be a classification for dns and pings and several others.

 I simply went and deleted all of them and added one for udp, any port number, and set it to highest priority.
Most fps games use udp networking protocol (wich is connectionless and has less overhead than tcp so it's a bit faster on and off the net stack - hence its use for fps games) for the actual game so all outgoing udp packets to any port will have the absolute highest priority in the router and get serviced before tcp, said tcp being what most web users are sending out on the network. This provides for less outbound latency in gaming where the net may have several users, and the non-udp users will notice little if any degradation in service. I selected any port since not every game uses the same ports and I don't want to have to set rules for every game when a simple single rule will cover all udp packets. More rules means more mem taken and more cpu time to apply the rule to each outbound packet. This is important because consumer routers are often cpu and memory limited and every help you can give them will result in better performance overall. So less is more here. I then set the default class in basic qos settings to high, and set the the qdisc scheduler to pfifo, since sfq employs a stochastic, deterministic meathod to prioritising packets, Pfif seems to get stuff in and out faster. After I set the router up and rebooted, I went and tried a pingtest online somewhere I usualy get a 28ms ping. It now tested 11ms, lowest I've ever seen. It makes for play that that is just a bit nicer.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quality_of_service
http://tomatousb.org/tut:using-tomato-s-qos-system
http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Quality_of_Service

These settings will be dependant upon the make and model of router and its firmware. Please consult the router manual for specifics. While in there you can save some router cpu time and memory by disabling services you don't use, such as upnp and others. Please research these services before disabling them so you don't cut your nose off in spite of your face.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on February 23, 2015, 10:48:44 AM
A word on compatibility mode;
I have a number of older games that run less than well or not at all on Vista, a stripped down version of wich is on my game box, so I tried compatability mode and the games now play as they should. As a test I placed t2 in compatability mode for 2k and the game seems to play fine and less ues may result, if any were due to being run under vista. Win7 and newer os may have more built in automatic support for the older games that refused to run on vista without compatability mode as this lack of older game/app support was a major complaint with vista users. Most of my games ran fine on 2k and xp so compatability mode went unused. Under vista and newer os, such drastic changes have been made in the os that games written for the 98 era have tough going and compatability mode actually does something now unlike with xp. Anyway, if you've an app or game that doesn't want to run or play nice, it's there if you need it.



http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/make-older-programs-run#1TC=windows-vista
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/what-is-program-compatibility#1TC=windows-vista

The important boxes to check in compatability mode seem to be Disable desktop composition and Disable visual themes as well as run as admin.
http://superuser.com/questions/694734/what-does-compatibility-option-disable-visual-themes-do


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on May 27, 2015, 08:23:34 PM
A word on FilterMsg.vl2

This is a nice script, it takes the kill messages and removes them from the chat hud, placing them in a corner by themselves where they can't bother anyone. I noted a less glitchy game after setting it to not timeout the messages but to let them scroll till they're bumped by new kill messages. You can edit it as a txt file wich is found in your prefs folder, oddly enough named FilterPrefs.txt.

So if editing by hand one would look for this line;
FilterMsg.timeOut = 0;
and set it to zero as it is here


If you don't have the script and must have it you can find it, along with a plethora of others, right here;
http://spinfusor.ch/tribes2/scripts/Scripts/



Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on June 15, 2015, 04:48:55 PM
A word on power supplies.......


I've long held that the single most important piece of hardware in any pc is its psu. Its quality determines how long it will last and how it treats the rest of the hardware in your system, as well as how stable that system runs. Skrimping at the psu is seldom a wise choice. I should know.

Anyway, the psu that has resided in my game system lo these last few years was one I purchased used in good condition, an adequate brand and adequate wattage. Unfortunately I let the smoke out of it a few days ago. Solid state electronics are imparted with a finite amount of smoke from the factory, held within the confines of said devices, if you let this smoke out not only is it nigh unpossible to put it back in, the device is usualy rendered inoperative in the act. Oh but I should have known something was amiss in psu land, it gave me fair warning, on more than one occasion.

At boot, when messing about in the bios options as I am wont to do, I check the hardware status menu, wich tells us important items of information such as the voltage of various voltage rails in the psu as well as cpu temps, fan speeds, etc.

I noted that the 12v rail wasn't stable at all, it was varying quickly from say 12v to 12.55, then back to 12, then to whatever. It normaly is around 12.5 to 12.9 volts or so and should be absolutely stable. I ignored it as the system showed no untoward symptoms, and this is where it got me. Suddenly the screen would go black in the middle not of an epic t2 match but looking at a static webpage of text and not come around no matter what mouse or kb dance I did, and it also stopped showing the bios log in screen, waiting for windows to load before giving me a display. I considered that my display was at fault, not so. So in trying another display to narrow down the cause of the malady still no bios at boot and the black screen of oblivion made itself manifest.

I did manage to get the system to show me the bios screen and I went to the hardware status menu to see if the voltage issue was strill present. Not only was it present it was worse, now the 12v rail was a rock steady 11 volts.
Pretty sure I had my culprit, the psu was flaking out.

After noting I was at a steady 11v rather than 12v as it should be I continued using the system until the smoke came out all of a sudden, and not just a little bit of smoke, a gallon of it at least. It smelled horrid. Anyway, I pulled the power and got the system unbuttoned looking for evidence of motherboard issues, but it seems the psu alone was expired.

So a search began for a localish psu supplier, and one was found a reasonable distance away. I looked at the various psus on their webpage and decided a 65o watt psu would do, and I ignorantly drove down to the store, 60 miles one way, to obtain it. I got to the store and noted they didn't have that model and brand I was interested in but they had another one with a familiar brand so I opted to fall for their bait and switch.

When I got home with my prize I decided to look over the reviews for this exact psu and was glad I did, as most people recommend you use it as a doorstop rather than a psu. many users had literal fires, others had doa, others had it die from 3 days to 3 weeks from installation. If it was only one or two reviewers who had issue with this psu I'd keep them in mind but use the psu. Since there were a plethora of them i knew I had purchased a lemon. Here's the lemon;
http://www.amazon.com/Thermaltake-TR-600-ATX12V-EPS12V-Computer/dp/B007W7ZWHK/ref=sr_1_2/184-4306538-9917867?ie=UTF8&qid=1434415018&sr=8-2&keywords=thermaltake+tr-600+tr2+600w

I read story after story of failed psus and decided this psu was not going to have a home in my pc, so back it went to the store for refund. Luckily, Best Buy had a 750w Corsair on sale, with Corsair being one of the most respected names in pc parts such as memory and psus. For about the same price as the one that could set my house aflame I got one of the best in its wattage;
http://www.corsair.com/en-us/cx-series-cx750m-modular-atx-power-supply-750-watt-80-plus-bronze-certified-modular-psu

So, before you settle on just any psu that comes along when you are desperate for a psu, shop around so you don't drive a few hundred miles wasting gas or buy one that can set your home or at least your pc aflame.

By the way here's a handy psu ranking site;
http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?108088-Official-XS-Power-Supply-Ranking-Phase-I

This psu will allow me to run my gtx280 (over 200w alone) rather than the gtx260 (uses less than 200w) I have been using for the last few years, and placing it all into a much larger case will ensure decent airflow and cooling. The gtx280 is a dated design but it has phenominal memory bandwidth for aa and aniso performance and  has more than enough power and memory for any version of Tribes i wish to play. The 280 would be pressing a 600w psu a bit hard, the 750 will loaf along, and better yet it has a single 12v rail of some 60 amps rather than the assinine dual 12v rails found in many psus.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on June 21, 2015, 08:02:25 PM
While looking into win7 netstack tuning, I found this page wich may be of interest to gamers;
http://betanews.com/2011/01/20/use-hidden-windows-tweaks-to-speed-up-your-internet-and-network-connections/

The pertinent bits a gamer will be interested in most are the following;

"Chimney Offload State

One of the first options listed here is "Chimney Offload State." It sounds a little cryptic, but the idea is a straightforward one: to transfer various network connection processing tasks from your PC's CPU to the network adapter, thus freeing up valuable processor time for other things.

This is generally a very good thing, then, and in theory at least Windows should turn this feature on whenever it detects that your hardware can handle it. So if the NETSH report says Chimney Offload State is "enabled" (or "automatic") on your PC then everything is working as it should, and you can move on to the next setting.

You can't rely on Windows activating this setting, though, so if Chimney Offload State is marked as "disabled" then you might want to try turning it on manually. Just type:

netsh int tcp set global chimney=enabled

-- and press "Enter," then reboot to try the new setting. If it's better, great; if you have problems, open another elevated command prompt and enter:

netsh int tcp set global chimney=disabled

-- to turn the technology off again.

Direct Cache Access

Windows 7 included a new technology called Direct Cache Access (DCA), which reduces system overheads by allowing a network controller to transfer data directly into your CPU's cache. That sounds good, but again there are compatibility issues: your controller, chipset and processor must all support DCA for it to work, which is probably why it's turned off by default. If NETSH reports that Direct Cache Access is disabled on your PC, though, you can try turning it on yourself. Enter:

netsh int tcp set global dca=enabled

-- and reboot to turn the feature on. Re-enter the command, replacing "=enabled" with "=disabled" if there are problems and you need to turn it off.

NetDMA State

Windows 7 also supports NetDMA, a technology that allows network adapters to transfer data directly to your application, again without needing your CPU to assist. This should be turned on, but if it's marked as "disabled" on your PC then a quick NETSH command will fix this. Enter:

netsh int tcp set global netdma=enabled

-- and reboot to turn the technology on. Use the same command, replacing "=enabled" with "=disabled" if you have any issues with NetDMA and want to turn it off again."



The enabling of these settings is dependent upon the motherboard, os, drivers, and nic card having these capabilities to begin with.
Tweak at your own risk.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on June 26, 2015, 04:34:25 PM
A (further) word on anti aliasing.

Enabling antialiasing removes (or attempts to remove) the jagged effect seen in diagonal lines across the screen as you play. This makes for much nicer image quality than without antialiasing, but it comes at a price as described in my first few posts in this thread. Lately I've been weighing the cost of fsssaa (full screen super sample anitaliasing) wich is tremendous as far as vid card workload and vid card memory traffic compared to the benefit thereof. I noted in T1 and T2 that even if fsssaa is enabled there are still random aliasied lines here and there, popping textures, shimmering textures, all of wich is bs, these effects shouldn't be present yet they are, and I figured with fsssaa there should be none of this crap. Oh yes the vid card driver is set to Highest Quality.

Enter fxaa.
Fxaa is available in many vid card driver control panels and works in T1, T2, TA and T:V as well, and this is great as it more or less eliminates texture popping and shimmer as well as aliasing. It also does it for a fraction of the time (as in 1.3ms) your vid card would take to render the same scene with msaa or even worse, fsssaa (wich can take several passes thru your vid card shader engine). But all is not perfect in fxaa-land, it will make the text in the game menus (server list, settings, etc) harder to read. But I'll take getting rid of lower fps, shimmer, popped textures, and aliasing at the price of slightly harder to read text. I tried fxaa a few years ago and settled on fsssaa as it was reputed to be the best in image quality, but have now revisited and revised my settings. Look for fxaa in your t2 game profile in your vid card driver control panel today. If you have any other form of antialiasing enabled disable it if you decide to use fxaa.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on June 28, 2015, 12:49:15 PM
A word on Tribes Ascend tribes.ini settings;

Code:
[SystemSettings]
CPUNumLogicalProcessors=2
Trilinear=True
StaticDecals=True
DynamicDecals=True
UnbatchedDecals=True
DecalCullDistanceScale=1.00000
DynamicLights=True
DynamicShadows=True
LightEnvironmentShadows=True
CompositeDynamicLights=True
SHSecondaryLighting=True
DirectionalLightmaps=True
OneFrameThreadLag=False
MotionBlur=False
MotionBlurPause=True
MotionBlurSkinning=1
DepthOfField=False
AmbientOcclusion=False
Bloom=False
bAllowLightShafts=False
Distortion=False
FilteredDistortion=False
DropParticleDistortion=False
bAllowDownsampledTranslucency=False
SpeedTreeLeaves=True
SpeedTreeFronds=True
LensFlares=False
FogVolumes=False
UseVsync=True
Fullscreen=True
AllowD3D10=True
AllowD3D11=False
AllowRadialBlur=False
AllowSubsurfaceScattering=False
SkeletalMeshLODBias=0
ParticleLODBias=0
DetailMode=2
ShadowFilterQualityBias=0
MaxAnisotropy=16
MaxMultisamples=0
MinShadowResolution=64
MinPreShadowResolution=8
MaxShadowResolution=1120
MaxWholeSceneDominantShadowResolution=1344
ShadowFadeResolution=128
PreShadowFadeResolution=16
ShadowFadeExponent=.25
PlayerShadowFadeResolution=16
ResX=1920
ResY=1080
SceneCaptureStreamingMultiplier=1.000000
ShadowTexelsPerPixel=1.27324
PreShadowResolutionFactor=.5
bAllowBetterModulatedShadows=False
bAllowWholeSceneDominantShadows=True
Borderless=false
TEXTUREGROUP_World=(MinLODSize=256,MaxLODSize=2048,LODBias=1,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_WorldNormalMap=(MinLODSize=256,MaxLODSize=2048,LODBias=1,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_WorldSpecular=(MinLODSize=256,MaxLODSize=2048,LODBias=1,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_Character=(MinLODSize=256,MaxLODSize=2048,LODBias=0,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_CharacterNormalMap=(MinLODSize=256,MaxLODSize=2048,LODBias=0,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_CharacterSpecular=(MinLODSize=256,MaxLODSize=2048,LODBias=0,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_Weapon=(MinLODSize=256,MaxLODSize=2048,LODBias=0,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_WeaponNormalMap=(MinLODSize=256,MaxLODSize=2048,LODBias=0,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_WeaponSpecular=(MinLODSize=256,MaxLODSize=2048,LODBias=0,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_Vehicle=(MinLODSize=512,MaxLODSize=1024,LODBias=0,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_VehicleNormalMap=(MinLODSize=512,MaxLODSize=1024,LODBias=0,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_VehicleSpecular=(MinLODSize=512,MaxLODSize=1024,LODBias=0,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_Cinematic=(MinLODSize=256,MaxLODSize=4096,LODBias=0,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_Effects=(MinLODSize=256,MaxLODSize=1024,LODBias=1,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_EffectsNotFiltered=(MinLODSize=256,MaxLODSize=1024,LODBias=1,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_Skybox=(MinLODSize=512,MaxLODSize=4096,LODBias=0,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_UI=(MinLODSize=512,MaxLODSize=1024,LODBias=1,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_Lightmap=(MinLODSize=512,MaxLODSize=4096,LODBias=0,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_Shadowmap=(MinLODSize=512,MaxLODSize=4096,LODBias=0,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,NumStreamedMips=3,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_RenderTarget=(MinLODSize=1,MaxLODSize=4096,LODBias=0,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_MobileFlattened=(MinLODSize=8,MaxLODSize=256,LODBias=0,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_ProcBuilding_Face=(MinLODSize=1,MaxLODSize=2048,LODBias=0,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_ProcBuilding_LightMap=(MinLODSize=1,MaxLODSize=2048,LODBias=0,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_Terrain_Heightmap=(MinLODSize=1,MaxLODSize=2048,LODBias=0,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_Terrain_Weightmap=(MinLODSize=1,MaxLODSize=2048,LODBias=0,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_ImageBasedReflection=(MinLODSize=128,MaxLODSize=2048,LODBias=0,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
TEXTUREGROUP_ColorLookupTable=(MinLODSize=1,MaxLODSize=2048,LODBias=0,MinMagFilter=Aniso,MipFilter=Point,MipGenSettings=TMGS_SimpleAverage)
m_TrShadowLODGroup=2
m_TrTextureLODGroup=2

[TribesGame.TrAudioSettings]
m_nVolumeMaster=100
m_nVolumeEffects=100
m_nVolumeMusic=100
m_nVolumeVoice=100

[WinDrv.WindowsClient]
DisplayGamma=2.7

[TribesGame.TrGameEngine]
bSmoothFrameRate=False
MaxSmoothedFrameRate=122
AllowScreenDoorFade=False
AllowNvidiaStereo3d=False
bForceStaticTerrain=True

[Engine.GameViewportClient]
bUseHardwareCursorWhenWindowed=TRUE

[TribesGame.TrDevice]
m_bTinyWeaponsEnabled=True

[Engine.Engine]
bForceStaticTerrain=True

[Engine.ISVHacks]
bInitializeShadersOnDemand=False
DisableATITextureFilterOptimizationChecks=True
UseMinimalNVIDIADriverShaderOptimization=True
PumpWindowMessagesWhenRenderThreadStalled=False

[TextureStreaming]
PoolSize=250
MemoryMargin=20
MemoryLoss=0
HysteresisLimit=20
DropMipLevelsLimit=16
StopIncreasingLimit=12
StopStreamingLimit=8
MinEvictSize=10
MinFudgeFactor=1
FudgeFactorIncreaseRateOfChange=0.5
FudgeFactorDecreaseRateOfChange=-0.4
MinRequestedMipsToConsider=11
MinTimeToGuaranteeMinMipCount=2
MaxTimeToGuaranteeMinMipCount=12
UseTextureFileCache=TRUE
LoadMapTimeLimit=5.0
LightmapStreamingFactor=0.04
ShadowmapStreamingFactor=0.04
MaxLightmapRadius=2000.0
AllowStreamingLightmaps=True
TextureFileCacheBulkDataAlignment=1
UsePriorityStreaming=True
bAllowSwitchingStreamingSystem=False
UseDynamicStreaming=True
bEnableAsyncDefrag=False
bEnableAsyncReallocation=False
MaxDefragRelocations=256
MaxDefragDownShift=128

[XAudio2.XAudio2Device]
MaxChannels=32
m_bEnableBassBoost=false

[TribesGame.TrPlayerController]
m_bEnableChatFilter=true
m_bShowHUDObjectives=true
m_bShowHUDNotifications=true
m_bShowHUDFriendStateNotifications=true
m_bEnableOverheadDamageIndicators=true
m_bShowHUDObjectives=true
m_bShowHUDReticule=true
m_bShowHUDCredits=true
m_bShowHUDAccolades=true
m_bShowHUDBadges=true
m_bShowHUDScores=true
m_bShowHUDHealthBar=true
m_bShowHUDVisor=true
m_bShowHUDChat=true
m_bShowHUDCombatLog=true
m_bShowHUDKillbox=true
m_bShowHUDDeathcam=true
m_bShowHUDHeroText=true
m_bShowHUDPromptPanel=true
m_bShowHUDRespawnTimer=true
m_bShowHUDSkiBars=true
m_bShowHUDFriendColoring=true
m_bShowHUDCracks=true
m_WhisperFilter=0
EnableAlienFX=false
m_bAnimMenu=true
m_bAllowSimulatedProjectiles=false

[TribesGame.TrEntryPlayerController]
m_bEnableChatFilter=true
m_bShowHUDObjectives=true
m_bShowHUDNotifications=true
m_bShowHUDFriendStateNotifications=true

The above tribes.ini, found in Games/Tribes/TribesGame/Config is what I use and it works fine, plays fine, looks fine. Make a copy of yours before you try mine so you can go back if needed. Much of the special effects are disabled so as to increase frame rate over image quality. For the configurable ingame settings menus set your resolution as desired and under the Video tab you want to have Graphics Detail set to Very High as this provides for farthest visible range. Set Texture Detail to Minimal for best fps and the game still looks great. Disable Smoothing as well as Motion Blur. In the ini is the string "OneFrameThreadLag=False", I prefer to play this way - you may not - so if you don't like the resulting play set this string to true and save the ini.
Thank you, drive through.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Virus on June 28, 2015, 04:37:14 PM
Thanks.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on July 08, 2015, 10:09:39 AM
A (further again) word on antialiasing;

In the search for high image quality I've tried most of the methods found in vid card driver control panels and found them lacking time and again. Too much aa and the image is blurred, text is hard to read, and the performance drop that comes with enhanced aa is pretty high. As described previously, fxaa seemed to result in, strangely enough, the best image quality overall out of the various aa methods available to me, yet it still had issues such as slight yet noticeable texture popping, crawling, shimmer, and worst of all it made text unreadable in a lot of cases. Fxaa image quality was better than even ssaa, but it still had issues however slight.

So on a whim I tried enabling msaa @ 2x and fxaa and all is bliss.
Msaa has a very low performance hit especially @ 2x and fxaa is almost free as far as performance goes.
No more texture popping, crawling, shimmer, and best of all text is perfectly readable.
This can be applied to most any game not just the tribes series.
The great payoff here is excellent image quality at the absolute least performance hit.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: rJay on July 08, 2015, 03:41:08 PM
My AA looks great and amazing, no problems except frame rate drop and frame tearing.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on July 09, 2015, 06:50:23 AM
Wait, I thought you liked jaggies?


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: rJay on July 09, 2015, 07:45:30 AM
You're killin' me man.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on September 14, 2015, 01:35:34 PM
I ran across this after looking into deleting the remnants of an old os after an upgrade;
Remove Old Drivers After Upgrading to New Hardware
http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/windows-vista/remove-old-drivers-after-upgrading-to-new-hardware/

This may help systems perform optimally.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on January 04, 2016, 12:36:48 PM
A word on TA and Hirez;

If you have ta installed, it came with a "service" that if left as installed will start up with the system, meaning you may not even play the game for the duration your pc is on yet hirez has access to your system. If you dislike the idea of others rummaging around your pc you can set this "service" to manual rather than automatic and still play the game. However, after playing the game you'll want to shut the service off untill next time you play. Just look for Hi-Rez Studios Authentication and Update service. Set it to manual as shown here;
http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/2495-services-start-disable.html
After playing the game, just fire up task manager and go to processes, click show processes from all users, then select hirez and right click the service, then click end process tree. If you don't shut it down after playing ta, the service is still running.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: rJay on January 07, 2016, 03:13:09 PM
A word on TA and Hirez;

If you have ta installed, it came with a "service" that if left as installed will start up with the system, meaning you may not even play the game for the duration your pc is on yet hirez has access to your system. If you dislike the idea of others rummaging around your pc you can set this "service" to manual rather than automatic and still play the game. However, after playing the game you'll want to shut the service off untill next time you play. Just look for Hi-Rez Studios Authentication and Update service. Set it to manual as shown here;
http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/2495-services-start-disable.html
After playing the game, just fire up task manager and go to processes, click show processes from all users, then select hirez and right click the service, then click end process tree. If you don't shut it down after playing ta, the service is still running.
This makes it look like they can go through your personal files with no limitations........which isn't exactly the case. Just to be clear here.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on February 02, 2016, 06:44:00 PM
A word on win10;



Using GWX Control Panel to Permanently Remove the 'Get Windows 10' Icon

GWX Control Panel is the easiest way for users of Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 to protect their computers from Windows 10. With GWX Control Panel you can: Remove the "Get Windows 10" icon that appears in your notification area, prevent your Windows Update control panel from upgrading your computer to Windows 10, prevent your computer from secretly downloading Windows 10 installation files, detect and remove the hidden Windows 10 installation files if they're already on your PC, optionally monitor your computer for unwanted Windows 10-related settings and files- and beginning with version 1.7 you can now easily delete some hard-to-remove program files that are known to cause Windows 10 upgrades and annoyances.
http://blog.ultimateoutsider.com/2015/08/using-gwx-stopper-to-permanently-remove.html


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on August 18, 2016, 10:12:39 AM
A word on Receive and Transmit buffers;

This is a nic tuning feature one can use to reduce latency a bit on both inbound and outbound packets, its effects should be noticeable. The other nic tweaks are good ideas too in some instances, some systems may perform better with interrupt moderation enabled. I set mine to half of their stock figures rather than the 96 as suggested in the guide, but try it and see how she plays, if you write down the stock figures you can always go back to them if desired.

https://rejzor.wordpress.com/2015/12/07/improve-network-performance-for-games/


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on November 10, 2016, 06:18:43 AM
The illustrious T2 warrior Sami - Fin has alerted me to an interview of some of the T2 devs;
http://www.ign.com/articles/2000/01/12/tribes-2-interview-2


 Dynamix: Thanks a ton for the interview. Anything else you'd like to add?

TG: Come get some!

MF: (laughs) Shazbot!




and a bonus link;
https://www.bluesnews.com/cgi-bin/board.pl?action=userinfo&user=5809


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on November 30, 2016, 11:09:44 AM
And a word from one of T2's devs;



Hmmm. The only thing I can think of is the significant patch we did at GarageGames as one of our first projects. I don't remember an official expansion; though we pitched doing one for Sierra, ultimately they went a different direction with the franchise.

Glad you're still playing!!


This was the response to my question below;
On Wed, Nov 30, 2016 at 6:20 AM Blakhart wrote:
    Hi (redacted), been a while since I emailed you, hope everything is well, and a friend asked me if I knew what the "Tribes2 Expansion Pack" is or was or could have been. I have to say I don't remember reading/hearing about it so I ask you for any input as well as any T2 history tidbits you'd like to pass along. Have a good one in whatever you're doing these days and thanks for some great games, still play t1 and t2 almost daily.

Blakhart


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: robertom2002 on November 30, 2016, 11:46:08 PM
The interview was an awesome read, and it's very cool to see that we still have one of the original t2 developers still responding to tribes 2 related stuff. I hope they come back to play their own game once in a while.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on May 27, 2017, 06:27:59 PM
A dev answers some burning Tribes questions;

Q; Always wondered what the file extensions in Tribes meant. Such as .cs, .dso, perhaps you could fill in the details?
A; I don't recall exactly what the extensions meant -- .cs was for script files, .dso might have been dynamix script object or something like that.


Q; Hi again and thanks for the reply on the file extensions. Another burning question for you; is it spoken "dynamics" or "dyna-mix"?
A; Dynamics


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: robertom2002 on May 28, 2017, 04:42:08 PM
Do the same dynamix people who worked on T2 also work on Midair? Who was the game designer?


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on May 28, 2017, 10:53:33 PM
Do the same dynamix people who worked on T2 also work on Midair? Who was the game designer?

MA is made by a separate group of devs.
https://www.playmidair.com/press/


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on June 12, 2017, 06:06:17 PM
A word on keeping backup parts and/or systems;

The other day while trying to play T2, my gtx280 went into "split screen" mode, one side of the screen had a different camera view from that of the left. This wasn't the only time the card had farted, with obvious artifacting taking place under no load conditions making me suspect the end was near for my elderly 280. For those inexperienced with such, this is a example of artifacting;
https://mlambert890.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/8800gtx_video_artifact_02.jpg
  Sometimes a driver or other software issue can cause the hardware to seem corrupted but in this case a driver revision didn't help at all, the card was on its last pixel. Good thing I had kept the gtx260 the 280 had replaced, so the 260 was installed and driver replaced with little to no apparent performance hit at least in t1 and t2. Ta is another matter where the greater total memory on the card is a great asset but the 250 plays it well enough. Ta was where the first artifacts became apparent but at the time I was unsure if the lockup was vid card or network related, in ta if the net farts the system basically freezes for a time. I could have gone with a newer vid card but the rest of the gaming pc's parts are 2008 era, however a more power efficient vid card would be nice to have. The 260 series are power hogs.

  So, moral of the story; keep spare parts or a spare system on hand for when your pc breaks - because it will. Like cars, it's almost a rule that if you have one you need two for when the first breaks down and leaves you somewhere.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on October 18, 2017, 07:10:32 PM
A word on mouse repair;

Lately my most recently purchased meece was starting to double click via the fire button, so I knew its days were numbered. This has happened often before, even to my fav mouse, the ms intellimouse. What happens is the return spring of the affected button loses tension, work hardens over repeated use, and sends double clicks when only one is intended. This gets to be realllllly aggravating. Anyway, I have a few meece around to loan spare parts and thought hey, why not try some of the repair ideas instead of spending more money first.

Here are some vids on the technique most used to repair mice with button malfunctions;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P8o4conOjPI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDoXMJyimDU

The vids show you the source of the issue, the microswitches that actuate most button controls on any given meece. Some microswitches are better than others, some will be rated to withstand several million clicks, some are barely up to the job when new.

My issue with the above videos is the repair technicians are simply retensioning the spring inside the microswitch, and that spring has already failed. I didn't want to reuse a switch that had already fatigued as the primary fire button of my game meece so I tried another tack.

That tack was to unsolder the least used microswitch in that meece and use that one to replace the faulty fire switch. There are three solder spots to hit on a given microswitch to unsolder and solder, and you can't get placement wrong on the pcb (printed circuit board) as the switch dealy is marked on the pcb like as if the switch was there on the board. I didn't need another meece for spare parts after all.

The least used microswitch in any of my meece is always the scroll wheel button, so I nicked that (all the microswitches in my meece are identical) and put it in place of the left click button. Most meece come apart very easily with just a screwdriver, but to use the soldering method of repair you have to have a soldering iron and solder, some soldering experience helps. If you don't have the tools or skills you can still use the method as shown in the vids that don't require iron or solder. Make sure you note what parts go where, the scroll wheel dealy has an optical encoder that is triggered by the passing of a shutter wheel, and that wheel can only go in the mouse one way - might help to take pics before you do any repair work.

Anopther issue some meece have is the actual plastic of the fire button, where it contacts the microswitch, becomes worn and will actually dish out. Some people use epoxy to fill the dish/depression in the plastic and then smooth the contact surface with some fine sand paper. I checked my meece and the plastic bits were unworn, so it was just the switch being bad, at least I hoped.
So I soldered the scroll wheel button in place of the fire button and vice versa, and oddly enough the scroll wheel button works fine, I wonder if the heat from soldering it stiffened the return spring or something so it works as it should.

I acknowledge the ghettoness of this repair, but replacing meece every year or so is expensive, this one cost me $80, and if I can bring it back from the dead for the cost of a few blobs of solder I'm gonna do it.

Anyway, just played some t2 and so far testing shows the meece is working fine, no double clicking or anything. This meece was bought at Frys back in 2008, so I used it to kill a lot of you in the duration, and now it can kill once again! When it goes bad next time I'll get a new meece or order some hi dolla microswitches and repair it the right way.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Blakhart on February 15, 2018, 08:19:45 PM
A word on sound wrappers;

This sound wrapper has been touted as a possible fix for the sound glitches commonly heard on multi core systems, heard almost always when pressing the jet button.
http://www.indirectsound.com/

I noted that the jet sound issue remains, however what was formerly "2 dimensional" audio is now more like 3 dimensional audio, ie it now has depth. The miles fast sound in my t2 install seemed to be very flat, either left or right audio and no depth, the new wrapper allows for that missing depth to be noted. It also works with most of the ancient games I play.


Title: Re: Video/game settings and you.
Post by: Ragora on February 17, 2018, 05:35:43 AM
A word on sound wrappers;

This sound wrapper has been touted as a possible fix for the sound glitches commonly heard on multi core systems, heard almost always when pressing the jet button.
http://www.indirectsound.com/

I noted that the jet sound issue remains, however what was formerly "2 dimensional" audio is now more like 3 dimensional audio, ie it now has depth. The miles fast sound in my t2 install seemed to be very flat, either left or right audio and no depth, the new wrapper allows for that missing depth to be noted. It also works with most of the ancient games I play.

I'm not certain it's bound to multi-core processors (just that pretty much all modern machines are at least dual core). Though I have some ancient desktops here I can see about attempting to reproduce it on. My one laptop might also allow me to disable multi core processing to achieve the same effect on a modern operating system.